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Started by Agaliarept on 13-Feb-2017 09:06:32
Britain's youngest Euromillions winner planning to sue lottery bosses for 'ruining' her life

Jane Park, who won £1m at the age of 17, said winning the windfall had “ruined” her life and she often thought things would have been better if she had never won.

“It’s scary how different my life is from my friends’. When they say they’re stressed about the money they mean their wages are s***,” she said. “There’s no one in the same boat as me, no one who really understands. I feel like I’m a 40-year-old.”

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/jane-park-euromillions-suing-ruined-her-life-shopping-a7576356.html

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Agaliarept - 13 Feb 2017 09:07:08 (#1 of 108)

There are some fair points raised in the article I guess but I'm finding it hard to locate the tiny bow for my tiny violin to play for the double home owner.

Tenesmus - 13 Feb 2017 09:09:23 (#2 of 108)

I don't do Indy links as it makes my phone explode. What's she actually complaining about?

Ginmonkey - 13 Feb 2017 09:09:45 (#3 of 108)

One presumes she needn't have accepted the money.

Do the lottery offer financial advice for winners.

It's kind of sweet she assumes that you don't have to worry about money once you are forty.

Agaliarept - 13 Feb 2017 09:10:56 (#4 of 108)

For those who don't Indy:

Britain’s youngest Euromillions winner has revealed she is planning to take legal action against lottery bosses for negligence.

Jane Park, who won £1m at the age of 17, said winning the windfall had “ruined” her life and she often thought things would have been better if she had never won.

Ms Park, now 21, argued that someone of her age should not have been allowed to win such a substantial sum of money. She said 18 should be the minimum age for winning the lottery and suggested the current limit of 16 was too young.

She said she had become bored of relentless consumption and felt like it failed to offered long-term genuine happiness. Before winning the lottery, Ms Park, who now owns two properties, worked as an admin temp for £8 an hour and lived in a small flat with her mum in Edinburgh.

“I thought it would make it 10 times better but it’s made it 10 times worse. I wish I had no money most days. I say to myself, ‘My life would be so much easier if I hadn’t won’,” she told the Sunday People.

“People look at me and think, ‘I wish I had her lifestyle, I wish I had her money.’ But they don’t realise the extent of my stress. I have material things but apart from that my life is empty. What is my purpose in life?”

“I think 18 should be the minimum age for winning the lottery, at the least. The current age of 16 is far too young.”

Despite the fact that Camelot, which runs EuroMillions in the UK, appointed an adviser to help Ms Park deal with her newly accumulated wealth, she said it was family advice that helped her keep her spending in check.

“I’ve read about other lottery winners who’ve just blown it all and I can totally see how it can be done,” she said. “I was stuck in front of a financial adviser who was using words like investment bonds. I had no clue what they meant.”

Ms Park said it was unsettling how differently her life had turned out from her friends, making her feel isolated.

“It’s scary how different my life is from my friends’. When they say they’re stressed about the money they mean their wages are s***,” she said. “There’s no one in the same boat as me, no one who really understands. I feel like I’m a 40-year-old.”

A spokesperson for Camelot told The Independent: "Camelot takes its duty of care to winners very seriously and all major winners are offered support and advice for as long as they wish. That support is tailored to each winner's situation and circumstances – and for younger winners, their age will obviously be an important factor in the advice and support offered.

“Following her win, Jane received extensive support from Camelot," it continued. "A dedicated winners’ adviser visited Jane at home to pay out her prize, arrange private banking and support her through the publicity when she chose to share news of her win. An independent financial and legal panel was set up shortly after her win and we put Jane in touch with another winner who won at the same age, to share their experience and help Jane adjust to the win.

“We keep in contact with all major winners for as long as they wish and have been in touch with Jane from time to time since her win to offer ongoing support. Of course, it is always up to the winners themselves as to whether they want to take us up that ongoing support and advice – but the door is always open and we will continue to support Jane in any way we can if that is what decides she wants.”

Camelot said the minimum age limit to play the lottery was an issue for Parliament to deal with.

“Anyone over the age of 16 can play the lottery, and therefore win a prize,” they said in a statement. “Camelot doesn’t set the age limit to play – this was agreed at the launch of the National Lottery back in 1994 and so any questions about the legal age to play would be a matter for Parliament.”

While most who play the lottery fantasise about the moment of winning the jackpot, the reality of winning can be more complicated. There are numerous stories of lottery winners who have struggled to get used to quitting their jobs and becoming rich overnight.

Callie Rogers, who was 16 and earning £3.60 an hour when she won a National Lottery jackpot worth £1,875,000 in 2003, struggled to adjust to her newfound wealth. She went on a spending spree and is reported to have tried to kill herself.

Ironically, Rogers has said she is much happier now she has spent her fortune. "I don't think of myself as a lottery winner - I try to forget the ups and downs I’ve been through and just feel like a normal person," she explained in 2013.

"It was too much money for someone so young. Even if you say your life won’t change, it does - and often not for the better."

browserbutton - 13 Feb 2017 09:12:30 (#5 of 108)

Oh yes, relentless consumption can become such a bore. Never mind.

Agaliarept - 13 Feb 2017 09:13:42 (#6 of 108)

There are numerous stories of lottery winners who have struggled to get used to quitting their jobs and becoming rich overnight.

It's the lack of an imagination that really gets me. How you can fail to be happy with time and financial freedom is beyond me.

Travel. Learn. Volunteer. Help people.

There are other options than spunking it all on annual trips to Dubai and flash cars.

zardoz - 13 Feb 2017 09:13:54 (#7 of 108)

Imagine if she won her case! Even *more* money! Woe!

JudgeMentalist - 13 Feb 2017 09:15:43 (#8 of 108)

Last year I met a 17 year old via work who'd won £100k on the lottery, gone in six months on holidays and clothes. She bleated like this one is bleating. I'm not sorry I don't have much sympathy for people who piss their life chances away in this manner. They do get help/advice, then they ignore it.

RosyLovelady - 13 Feb 2017 09:16:24 (#9 of 108)

This young person could be adding to her tale of woe that now she has the dosh to go to court when she isn't really responsible enough to do so in a sensible manner.

TommyDGNR8 - 13 Feb 2017 09:20:02 (#10 of 108)

It's the lack of an imagination that really gets me. How you can fail to be happy with time and financial freedom is beyond me.

A million quid at 17 is a long way short of the amount you'd need to be looking at a work-free life; it's barely average wage for a working lifetime and that's before inflation.

Ginmonkey - 13 Feb 2017 09:21:39 (#11 of 108)

But enough to fund you to go travelling for a few years or get a really decent education with no debt and have a good amount left over to set you up in terms of a decent property.

thisonehasalittlehat - 13 Feb 2017 09:22:24 (#12 of 108)

It will give you an income of about 50,000 a year, which is pretty good for an 18 year old I'd say. And if you derive that income from property you won't really suffer from significant capital depreciation either.

Agaliarept - 13 Feb 2017 09:23:37 (#13 of 108)

A million quid at 17 is a long way short of the amount you'd need to be looking at a work-free life; it's barely average wage for a working lifetime and that's before inflation.

Yeah but she could start a business, get highly educated. Pay for specialist training and have a fulfilling life.

Fair enough she can't retire but she had an opportunity most don't.

Arjuna - 13 Feb 2017 09:27:03 (#14 of 108)

Britain’s youngest Euromillions winner has revealed she is planning to take legal action against lottery bosses for negligence

Hmm, a fool with money - a lawyer's dream.

thisonehasalittlehat - 13 Feb 2017 09:27:39 (#15 of 108)

The fact that it's an average wage for a working lifetime doesn't mean that 1m at 18 is the same as working your entire life for an average wage. Although it is worth pointing out that on that basis she doesn't actually have to work. Clearly 1m invested wisely will appreciate significantly over the course of a lifetime.

RosyLovelady - 13 Feb 2017 09:27:41 (#16 of 108)

< a fool with money - a lawyer's dream. >

Nobody told her about that either. Woe is she.

Ginmonkey - 13 Feb 2017 09:28:46 (#17 of 108)

Yeah it seems a bit sad. I am sure we are a idiots when we are young and if presented with a million quid would make some poor decisions. However why go legal? Learn from your mistakes, do things better in future and get on with your life.

Agaliarept - 13 Feb 2017 09:29:49 (#18 of 108)

Although it is worth pointing out that on that basis she doesn't actually have to work.

Could you imagine what you could do with that income guaranteed though? You could 'work' for anyone for free for experience that could let you start a business.

Spend even a couple of minutes thinking what you could do with your life with a regular income that you didn't have to lift a finger for and her lack of vision just looks worse.

AlanII - 13 Feb 2017 09:30:34 (#19 of 108)

If it's such a fucking burden she could always donate it to charity (or share it amongst her friends or...).

Gotout - 13 Feb 2017 09:31:51 (#20 of 108)

"I wish I had no money most days."



I know a nice Nigerian bank manager who'd like to help her there.

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