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Started by Agaliarept on Apr 16, 2018 9:29:01 AM
Sleep/ Health question: What's this all about?

I have a health question and obviously I understand the GP is the best place for this but I didn't want to waste the vast knowledge and experience we have here.

See post #1

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Agaliarept - 16 Apr 2018 09:29:04 (#1 of 35)

When I was a kid I had a lot of trouble sleeping. I have always attached it to the ongoing battle with depression/ anxiety/ rage I’ve been fighting. In my teens I was prescribed amitriptyline to help me sleep.

When I was about 25 I discovered pot. I’ve pretty much smoked every day since then. One of the main effects of being a stoner was suddenly I found sleep wasn’t an issue at all. Over those last 15 years I’ve become a heavy sleeper. I can fall asleep in minutes and sleep uninterrupted until my alarm goes off.

Something that has been cropping up though, and has again this month is when I don’t smoke I have very vivid dreams that wake me up. I am also waking every day with the bed drenched in sweat. Not just a bit too warm but literally soaking with sweat.

I know night sweats can be attached to all kinds of worrying illnesses but I can guarantee the minute I have a joint I will be back to sleeping like a corpse.

Anyone come across anything like this?

VeniVidiVicious - 16 Apr 2018 09:33:11 (#2 of 35)

Sounds like withdrawal to me.

BrouTwo - 16 Apr 2018 09:33:20 (#3 of 35)

I know this isn't what you asked but please don't cuddle/co-sleep/snooze on the sofa with or near your newborns if you've been smoking. Also don't let them sleep near any soft furnishings that you've smoked pot near. It's a big cot death risk. Eleven years ago this week my friend's baby died in his arms while they were napping on their sofa. Pot was very likely a factor.

hailesaladdie - 16 Apr 2018 09:35:39 (#4 of 35)

Sounds a lot like withdrawal to me - very similar in description to when I was drinking.

Agaliarept - 16 Apr 2018 09:37:45 (#5 of 35)

Sounds like withdrawal to me.

I definitely agree I do 'withdraw' in terms of my mood but that is as much the fact I don't smoke tobacco when I'm out of pot so I withdraw from that but I'm smoking such small amounts, (1 or 2 before bed) that it seems a bit extreme for the amount.

Don't worry Brou don't do anything like that.

I sometimes have a joint at 6am on the way to the bus and then a couple before bed but none of the kids are anywhere near when this is happening. Sorry to hear about your friend :(

otraynor - 16 Apr 2018 09:38:08 (#6 of 35)

What VVV said. I know people say it can't happen, but I've seen two people who were physically dependent on pot.

Agaliarept - 16 Apr 2018 09:39:16 (#7 of 35)

Sounds a lot like withdrawal to me

Interesting.

I would agree apart from one factor. A couple of years ago I gave up for 10 months. Pretty much sweated every night for that period.

We ended up having to have separate sleeping covers as I would soak everything I touched.

Delighted_User - 16 Apr 2018 09:39:42 (#8 of 35)

Vivid dreams are so common after stopping as to be considered universal, though they're not -- I so rarely remember my dreams that I didn't notice cannabis, or the lack of it, having any effect until I read about it, at which point I noticed that I was marginally more likely to have a memorable dream or two when not smoking, but that was about it. Never heard of the sweats as such as a symptom, but people are idiosyncratic. Do they go after a time?

otraynor - 16 Apr 2018 09:40:37 (#9 of 35)

So by joint, do you mean tobacco rolled with some pot in it, or a joint made entirely of pot?

hailesaladdie - 16 Apr 2018 09:42:32 (#10 of 35)

How would your say your mood was when you gave up?

The only person I know who's had night sweats over such a sustained period had them as a result of Lupus. But that's quite an extreme example.

Agaliarept - 16 Apr 2018 09:42:57 (#11 of 35)

Do they go after a time?

They haven't so far. When I quit they were a permanent feature and they stopped the instant I started up again.

I have a feeling the bud is covering up some pretty difficult problems. During that 10 month period I had some pretty intense therapy but I came to the end of what I was allotted by my insurance and to continue would have had to pay.

It worked out a lot more expensive than the pot I was buying so I couldn't continue.

Agaliarept - 16 Apr 2018 09:44:07 (#12 of 35)

So by joint, do you mean tobacco rolled with some pot in it, or a joint made entirely of pot?

The first one. Rolling tobacco with green added.

How would your say your mood was when you gave up?

Very low. I won't say suicidal but for nearly a year it was a struggle not to just give everything up and wander off into the distance.

HouseOfLametta - 16 Apr 2018 09:46:07 (#13 of 35)

Tobacco withdrawal is a bastard and filled with horrid dreams.

If you are still having the occasional fag when you have dropped the weed you can keep it going for a lifetime.

Agaliarept - 16 Apr 2018 09:49:16 (#14 of 35)

I had no idea about that Hol.

I mean, I smoked fags from 15 onwards. had given up once or twice in the time between then and my mid 20s when I stopped smoking tobacco on its own and don't remember anything like this.

But I have had the odd sneaky fag when I'm out of weed.

hailesaladdie - 16 Apr 2018 09:53:49 (#15 of 35)

Night sweats can also be the result of anxiety. A low mood coupled with tobacco withdrawal would certainly leave you anxious.

I started having panic attacks when I gave up smoking. It's very unlikely it was the main or sole cause, but these things add up... On the plus side, the entire experience was so vile, it made me determined never to smoke again.

Agaliarept - 16 Apr 2018 10:02:40 (#16 of 35)

I started having panic attacks when I gave up smoking. It's very unlikely it was the main or sole cause, but these things add up... On the plus side, the entire experience was so vile, it made me determined never to smoke again.

How long did all this last?

uranrising - 16 Apr 2018 10:17:38 (#17 of 35)

Agaliarept

Speaking as a retired Gestalt therapist, if I were in your shoes, (and knowing what I've learnt), I would choose a Gestalt therapist (a bit of a task in itself), and forego whatever is necessary.(Whether anyone does that or not depends a lot on the degree to which they value themselves. "A life unexamined etc.etc."). If undertaken out of true choice, and with real wish to deal with all this, an enormous amount can be achieved.

And I am not in your shoes.

hailesaladdie - 16 Apr 2018 10:18:00 (#18 of 35)

I got help after a couple of months (initially medication, then CBT). The attacks tapered off after 3-4 months, lasted about 9 in earnest. I still feel them coming on occasion (am quite claustrophobic, that sets it off) but I know how to see them off now.

Agaliarept - 16 Apr 2018 10:26:28 (#19 of 35)

Speaking as a retired Gestalt therapist

Looking briefly at what Wiki says, it seems there were elements of that used in my last therapy course. My problem is the financing of something that is possibly endless.

The attacks tapered off after 3-4 months, lasted about 9 in earnest.

Ouch. I had about a solid six months of panic attacks in college (just before being prescribed the sleeping drugs) so you have my sympathies.

Luckily they haven't been a feature since I was younger. My biggest hurdle when I'm not smoking is just how little I want to make the effort to get by day to day. I would happily just go into the cupboard under the stairs and stay there if I could. The world holds very little attraction to me.

In the past various therapies have helped but it's always temporary and I find the cost of continuing prohibitive.

For about £20 a week I can medicate and become a semi functioning member of society.

The main difficulty is swapping something that works for something that might work that I also may have to wait a long time to even begin.

hailesaladdie - 16 Apr 2018 10:30:22 (#20 of 35)

Thanks, Agalia. It's a long time ago now, though... The point of mentioning it, though, was to illustrate how one trigger factor can push you over the edge, as it were, whether it's panic or the sweats.

> For about £20 a week I can medicate and become a semi functioning member of society

At what long-term cost, though? Doesn't your post above contain some potential warning signs?

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