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Started by SheikYerbouti on Jun 6, 2018 4:35:50 PM
ORGANIC SALT

WHY ISN'T YOUR SALT ORGANIC?

https://realsalt.com/why-isnt-real-salt-organic/

Have any salty posters got any views on this matter?

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BasilSeal - 06 Jun 2018 17:01:03 (#1 of 259)

Salt is a mineral that gets dug out of the ground, by definition it can't be 'organic' in the sense that it is not a living thing that gets grown according to a set of official standards. Though i suspect your links says this.

FredDee - 06 Jun 2018 17:04:00 (#2 of 259)

in scientific terms 'organic' means containing carbon ( in whatever molecular form ).

Salt is sodium chloride and so, scientifically, is NOT organic.

CentristDad - 06 Jun 2018 17:04:11 (#3 of 259)

If one were to take salty excretions such as sweat and, er, other things that are, apparently, salty and then evaporate/precipitate the salts from them then would that be "organic salt"?

er, you fucking morons?

SheikYerbouti - 06 Jun 2018 17:06:22 (#4 of 259)

None of these contributions are anywhere near salty enough for my taste.

FleurDuMal - 06 Jun 2018 17:07:04 (#5 of 259)

<paging billers...>

WibbleAgain - 06 Jun 2018 17:07:50 (#6 of 259)

It's a site that sells salt that's claimed to be "real":

Real Salt is produced in dedicated facilities that have never been used for other products. No gluten, nuts, seeds, eggs, soy, milk, or other common allergens have ever touched our production lines, and they never will. There are no additives or anti-caking agents in Real Salt, either—just high-quality salt and 60+ trace minerals, now and always.

But it doesn't tell us if it's made from highly polluted sea water or what.

robbie76 - 06 Jun 2018 17:07:53 (#7 of 259)

My partner ordered organic logs to put in our fireplace a few years ago. £90 a bag.

nemo75 - 06 Jun 2018 17:11:51 (#8 of 259)

I hope they were free range.

mememe - 06 Jun 2018 17:13:43 (#9 of 259)

My partner ordered organic logs to put in our fireplace a few years ago. £90 a bag.

To be fair though, he/she has already shown questionable judgement.

cozzer - 06 Jun 2018 17:26:03 (#10 of 259)

just high-quality salt and 60+ trace minerals

It's quite bold that they are claiming having over 60 impurities as a positive thing.

browserbutton - 06 Jun 2018 17:27:09 (#11 of 259)

I only sprinkle PINK HIMALAYAN salt on my food, content in the knowledge that it has never been anywhere near the sea with all that fishy enshittenment and killer micro-plastics.

FleurDuMal - 06 Jun 2018 18:01:43 (#12 of 259)

It’s pink because it’s contaminated.

Enjoy!

browserbutton - 06 Jun 2018 18:05:21 (#13 of 259)

Aaargh!

RosyLovelady - 06 Jun 2018 18:11:14 (#14 of 259)

< in scientific terms 'organic' means containing carbon >

Yes, that's what I was taught all those years ago, and now it means that my carbon footprint is completely organic.

uranrising - 06 Jun 2018 23:29:49 (#15 of 259)

I've used a search engine and now know more.

Stellata - 06 Jun 2018 23:37:25 (#16 of 259)

it has never been anywhere near the sea with all that fishy enshittenment and killer micro-plastics.

I must say I choose rock salt over sea salt for this very reason.

otraynor - 07 Jun 2018 01:44:17 (#17 of 259)

But it doesn't tell us if it's made from highly polluted sea water or what.

It's from Utah. Definitely not sea water.

HouseOfLametta - 07 Jun 2018 06:43:41 (#18 of 259)

In what way has rock salt “never been anywhere near the sea”?

AppleCatcher - 07 Jun 2018 06:48:19 (#19 of 259)

Good question. Which was there first: the sea or the salt?

wickeltisch - 07 Jun 2018 06:54:22 (#20 of 259)

Salt is a mineral that gets dug out of the ground

A pedant says: salt can also be produced by putting sea water in shallow containers in a warm climate, the water evaporates and the salt stays behind, no need to dig it from the ground.

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