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Started by LumpyBits on Jan 7, 2019 5:04:30 PM
Getting back property seized by the police

A friend of mine is in a horrible predicament and needs some advice. As part of a criminal investigation into her husband (which was a complete surprise to her), computers and IT equipment were seized from the home, including IT equipment supplied by her employer as part of her job.

Online searches have advice on retrieving personal goods, but not on work equipment and her employers have now started to make the wrong kind of noises about her liability for their property.

Does anyone know about who's responsible for what under such circumstances or is there any advice you can offer?

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JohnIlly - 07 Jan 2019 17:13:03 (#1 of 13)

It is surely up to her employers to approach the police about their property.

PS I am not a lawyer.

bossab2 - 07 Jan 2019 17:21:54 (#2 of 13)

You could ask nicely.

( however my experience is that the plod are an unregulated law unto themselves )

HerrWalrus - 07 Jan 2019 17:22:27 (#3 of 13)

Steal it.

Gotout - 07 Jan 2019 17:28:48 (#4 of 13)

A solicitor would probably be the best way forward. She might be able to get the advice free.

LumpyBits - 07 Jan 2019 17:28:51 (#5 of 13)

It is surely up to her employers to approach the police about their property



Thanks everyone.

I guess this is the crux of the matter - is it in fact their responsibility or is it hers, to chase up plod.

Her company have policies on who is responsible for equipment if it's lost or damaged, but this is an exceptional situation and I don't think anyone really knows who is responsible.

Of course, she's terribly worried that her employer could somehow how this over her as some kind of disciplinary or bringing her company into disrepute.

Tenesmus - 07 Jan 2019 17:38:03 (#6 of 13)

Well she shouldn't be unless she allowed him to use her work equipment.

(IANAL)

Cordelia - 07 Jan 2019 17:38:18 (#7 of 13)

I doubt it very much. I assume there was a warrant - has anyone checked to see if the employer’s equipment was legitimately removed?

LumpyBits - 07 Jan 2019 17:51:25 (#8 of 13)

Thanks again. From what I understand, there was definitely a warrant. I won't go into detail for obvious reasons, but it looks like her husband is being investigated as part of a much bigger thing and she's been told any news on whether it'll be followed up with a charge could take many months.

Her company are getting itchy over getting their equipment back, but there is no end in sight as far as she can tell.

Cordelia - 07 Jan 2019 17:59:04 (#9 of 13)

The company legal team should be dealing with this anyway. Your poor friend has enough on her plate.

SinnerBoy - 14 Jan 2019 15:20:32 (#10 of 13)

On getting property back from the Police....

The wanker who left an "art installation" bomb on the High Level Bridge, in Newcastle, last year, has been sentenced to a community order.

It transpires that, the day after he was arrested, he called 999, to ask for it back!

RosyLovelady - 16 Jan 2019 09:45:17 (#11 of 13)

< her employer could somehow hold this over her as some kind of disciplinary or bringing her company into disrepute >

Sorry to say that many companies would jump at the chance. From their point of view, it's all her fault for marrying the sort of person this sort of thing happens to.

Dayraven - 16 Jan 2019 09:55:22 (#12 of 13)

It transpires that, the day after he was arrested, he called 999, to ask for it back!

The police may have been fighting the temptation to return the wrong unexploded bomb at that point.

SinnerBoy - 16 Jan 2019 16:55:01 (#13 of 13)

A real weapon for a real, weapons-grade bell end, you mean?

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