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Started by JiveBunny on Oct 27, 2020 10:36:36 AM
Has anyone been diagnosed with ADHD as an adult?

The more I read about it, the more it seems to fit, but I'm worried I'll speak to a specialist and seem like I've diagnosed myself via Dr Google. I've also just got on the waiting list (expected non-Covid time - 1 year) a year after asking, because nobody seemed to be able to decide who to refer me....and as things feel worse now I'm not in my normal routine with working from home, I just want to know if something IS going on, y'know?

Any experiences? Did it make any difference to be diagnosed?

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ATtcha - 29 Oct 2020 18:00:41 (#1 of 52)

The diagnosis depends on whether the criteria of the Diva test are met, you can download it here (it costs 10€)

https://www.divacenter.eu/DIVA.aspx?id=534

thisonehasalittlehat - 29 Oct 2020 18:12:35 (#2 of 52)

Is it really called Diva?

ATtcha - 29 Oct 2020 18:16:04 (#3 of 52)

It's an acronym, let's not typecast anyone.

MaryMC - 29 Oct 2020 23:23:49 (#4 of 52)

There's a thread here you might find useful; it's about adults being diagnosed with autism, but I don't remember if it specifically mentions ADHD.

http://notthetalk.com/discussion/list/5846?start=2
174#post_8839867

rainwoman - 01 Jan 2021 13:59:39 (#5 of 52)

https://www.addept.org/living-with-adult-add-adhd/how-to-reduce-overwhelm-when-you-have-adhd/

RosyLovelady - 07 Jan 2021 20:31:37 (#6 of 52)

DIVA's a bit of a loaded acronym for this organisation to have settled upon, presumably after much serious thought.

AdonisBlue - 07 Jan 2021 20:35:54 (#7 of 52)

Medicalisation of the normal. We all have something wrong if you Google hard enough. No one is normal.

Verdigris - 07 Jan 2021 20:37:06 (#8 of 52)

We're all part of life's great spectrum.

RosyLovelady - 07 Jan 2021 20:38:47 (#9 of 52)

I'm going to have NormalDiva as my next user name.

Anchorman - 07 Jan 2021 21:06:05 (#10 of 52)

No one is normal.



shakes both heads

1Nridi - 13 Jan 2021 01:03:23 (#11 of 52)

I only have ADD. I didn’t have it until I was about 45 & thought I had dementia. I was diagnosed & put on adderall & I could think! I knew then how it helped so many of the students I’d taught. I’d seen it make a HUGE difference in their behavior and grades.

Now USA laws have changed & my new dr doesn’t prescribe adderall. That’s fine. I’m not wanting drugs, just want to be able to think. I did well for about a year, but my ADD has gotten so bad I can’t even spell. I think for many minutes what I want to say. I can’t be put back on it. Maybe he can change some of my meds. I’ve heard some make you not able to think clearly.

ATtcha - 13 Jan 2021 10:36:06 (#12 of 52)

I'm surprised you were diagnosed with ADD if you didn't have it as a child as the first diagnosis criteria is to have shown symptoms as a child, it's part of the DIVA test. And ADD isn't a begnign form of ADHD, it's as bad as ADHD for the person who is concerned, the agitation is only less perceptible to others.

For all the people who self-diagnose with ADHD or ADD I'll advise to read up on the subject, the behaviour description is really not flattering.

As I begun to lose the ability to concentrate after two concussions I wasn't diagnosed with it but I was prescribed Wellbutrin (Bupropion), the effect is excellent but it took three months to really kick in.

JiveBunny - 21 Jan 2021 14:10:41 (#13 of 52)

ATcha - I'm female, grew up in the 80s and was a gifted child who could focus on something that interested them, three things which make a diagnosis less likely. I'm wary of reading up on it too much, though, as I don't want to self-diagnose. What I have read fits, and explains a lot of persistent issues I've been having since childhood, hence me wanting to pursue it so I can work out how to actually deal with them properly.

"Medicalisation of the normal. We all have something wrong if you Google hard enough. No one is normal."

Cool, thanks. That was the kind of thinking that stopped me getting help for things in the past.

Post deleted by user
ATtcha - 21 Jan 2021 20:54:30 (#15 of 52)

@ JiveBunny

If you have reasons to believe you that have it you should try to get a diagnosis, find a neurologist who specialises in ADHD who could refer you to someone for the tests (a psycho-neurologist) and prescribe medications.

The ability to focus on a subject of interest (even hyperfocus) is not incompatible with ADHD. The DIVA test I linked to above is the diagnosis tool, you can see for yourself if you meet the criteria, but it's really worth consulting if you have cognitive issues.

sophster - 24 Jan 2021 19:37:03 (#16 of 52)

JB I should be starting meds soon as I got a "working diagnosis" of probably having it. I tick a lot of the inattention and not much of the hyperactivity side of things. Like you I grew up in the 80s, not gifted but smart enough to get by in school despite difficulties paying attention/doing subjects I found boring.

rainwoman - 25 Jan 2021 11:25:06 (#17 of 52)

I'd be really interested to know how you get on with the meds, Sophster, if you don't mind?

This is pretty useful: https://www.additudemag.com/adhd-at-work-time-wasters-and-productivity-killers/amp/

sophster - 25 Jan 2021 15:07:43 (#18 of 52)

Slightly apprehensive and hopeful with the meds, even though I work in world of pharma still can't wrap my head around their mode of action. I feel like over the years I've developed a lot of strategies and coping mechanisms to get along in the workplace but it's a continued slog and feels a bit like a sticking plaster when really I need stitches.

rainwoman - 25 Jan 2021 16:53:15 (#19 of 52)

That sounds very familiar, sophster. At the moment, I'm not going with the meds, but that might change.

mingmong - 25 Jan 2021 17:14:47 (#20 of 52)

Different strokes etc. but judging by Mrs Ming's meds these things are still pretty crude: and designed primarily to tone down symptoms that are troublesome for third parties (e.g. families, carers, teachers etc.), not infrequently at the cost of the emotional well-being of the patient themselves

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