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Started by joesvejk on Aug 25, 2016 3:31:13 PM
Suggest a book to read.

Which you think most people will enjoy.

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joesvejk - 25 Aug 2016 15:33:27 (#1 of 10)

Until I Find You by John Irving. The story of a tattoo artist and her yong son and their search for his errant father

Bonusy - 26 Aug 2016 11:38:33 (#2 of 10)

I don't think there are any books which you can expect at least half the population to enjoy, tastes are too fragmented for this to happen.

lapsedcat - 26 Aug 2016 11:39:47 (#3 of 10)

The Beast Must Die by Nicholas Blake

RosyLovelady - 27 Aug 2016 12:49:31 (#4 of 10)

Love Nina by Nina Stibbe. Even if you soon begin to wonder quite how unedited those letters really are, it's still very funny..

Tomnoddy - 25 May 2021 02:09:10 (#5 of 10)

The Lighthouse, by PD James. Compulsively readable, but I couldn't describe why. It's all a bit preposterous.

widenation - 25 May 2021 03:07:17 (#6 of 10)

Jesus' Son - Denis Johnson

bailliegillies - 22 Jun 2021 08:31:22 (#7 of 10)

Just picked up two books while down in Glasgow, both look interesting reads.

First by Peter Frankopan, The New Silk Road, a following on of his The Silk Roads, an alternate history of the world..

Second is Past Mistakes by David Mountain and is about what we've got wrong with history and why. I've started reading it and itlooks very interesting.

redginger - 16 Aug 2021 20:01:32 (#8 of 10)

The Robert the Bruce Trilogy, by Nigel Tranter.

slimpickins - 16 Aug 2021 20:03:38 (#9 of 10)

The New Silk Road is really interesting.

Wobble to Death by Peter Lovesey, murder mystery set in 1879 at an endurance walking race, I first read it in the 80s and it remains one of my favourites of the genre.

Tadagee - 16 Aug 2021 21:08:22 (#10 of 10)

Recommended by The Times I just read 'A Winter War' by Tim Leach.

Set in the late 2nd C and based around Marcus Aurelius' campaign to extend the Roman Empire beyond the Danube into the Steppes.

Told primarily from the perspective of a warrior in the Samartian cavalry opposing them, it's a fascinating work of fiction seeking to contextualise some of the things we know about the Samartians, e.g women warriors who could only leave the warband to start a family after three kills, the tradition of a man who could no longer ride being killed by his eldest son.

Obviously a lot of supposition, but a book less about the plot, which is admittedly great, than about trying to understand and portray the lives of warrior tribes from the time.

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