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Started by Verdigris on Aug 25, 2021 4:18:38 PM
The Heat Pump Thread

The next big thing? Better than sliced bread? Are you considering having one? If you've got one, what are you experiences of installation and usage?

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Verdigris - 25 Aug 2021 16:23:11 (#1 of 155)

Well, I'm in the throes of buying a house with LPG central heating. I'm going to install a heat pump, of one sort or another, and it would be nice to have some feedback from those who have taken the plunge. General heat pump chat would also pass the time and perhaps bring up ideas I, or others , haven't thought of.

tasselhoff - 25 Aug 2021 17:26:11 (#2 of 155)

Can't really help, personally. I've just done cursory research.

Verdigris - 25 Aug 2021 16:27:40 (#3 of 155)

I fart in your general direction!

Dementor - 25 Aug 2021 17:49:52 (#4 of 155)

I thought this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2-_x0XZUSM was an interesting video - the bloke did all necessary the calculations and fitted it himself, plus there’s some decent info links in the description.

Dementor - 25 Aug 2021 17:53:35 (#5 of 155)

What were you thinking - ground or air sourced? I gather you don’t need planning consent for a single air-sourced unit any more, subject to some siting restrictions.

Verdigris - 25 Aug 2021 17:02:00 (#6 of 155)

Yes, I've seen that from a link elsewhere. It also features in a pretty thorough book I've found called Heat Pumps For The Home by John Cantor.

The downside of DIY is you aren't eligible for the RHI (renewable heat incentive) which returns most of your capital outlay, on a ground/water source system, over 7 years. The snag is RHI finishes at the end of March, next year, so it could be a struggle to to get the system commissioned in time to claim. The replacement scheme hasn't been finalised but it is rumoured to be a lump sum, which may favour an air-source set-up.

Verdigris - 25 Aug 2021 17:07:32 (#7 of 155)

#5 Ideally water source, as there's a culverted stream running through the garden. There could be enough room for ground source if the water idea doesn't add up. I may have to fall back on air-source if time runs out.

JennyRad - 25 Aug 2021 17:08:20 (#8 of 155)

I have hazy recollections that Anchorman might have some experience in the field; I'll link to this thread in the Gardening thread where I expect he'll see it. MrRad and I have been idly talking about the possibility, but it's at very early contemplative stages.

Verdigris - 25 Aug 2021 17:13:12 (#9 of 155)

I think Anchs has been using air-con units in reverse. Last I heard, one had packed up and probably wasn't economically repairable.

OldLefty - 25 Aug 2021 18:18:09 (#10 of 155)

I made some tentative enquiries a while back and was told that ground pumps could use your existing radiators but air pumps needed much bigger ones.

Dementor - 25 Aug 2021 18:18:21 (#11 of 155)

Yeah, I’ve been thinking about it - but nowhere near to the level Verdi has.

Pondered extracting heat from the loft (like a furnace in summer) and pumping it into the ground for winter use - not sure if that’s a efficient use of solar electricity though.

bossab2 - 25 Aug 2021 18:24:08 (#12 of 155)

The next big thing?

No, they've been around since the year dot. (18 something or other).

They're just refrigerators running backwards.

Ideally you have a pond as a large body of water stores lots of heat you can pump.

Air source ones arent as good as these require fans. Which are noisy and piss the neighbours off.

And when its really cold they dont work.

Verdigris - 25 Aug 2021 17:27:35 (#13 of 155)

was told that ground pumps could use your existing radiators but air pumps needed much bigger ones.



That's not strictly correct. Ground source can deliver higher flow temperatures, but nowhere near as hot as a gas boiler, except at woeful efficiency, so you need larger radiators in both cases. Underfloor heating is best, though, because flow temperatures can be even lower, increasing efficiency.

Verdigris - 25 Aug 2021 17:28:42 (#14 of 155)

#12 Do fuck off, you negative know-all.

OldLefty - 25 Aug 2021 18:33:36 (#15 of 155)

That probably rules them out for us then (old house with slate slab floors in a conservation area). Unless they can do warm air heating, perhaps.

bossab2 - 25 Aug 2021 18:37:16 (#16 of 155)

You might get an issue with the grey metal box on the wall in a conservation area.

https://images.app.goo.gl/L2ZV7kosfusH7pwj9

OldLefty - 25 Aug 2021 18:39:09 (#17 of 155)

Probably not - the place where it would be isn't visible anywhere with public access. Our existing oil boiler is bigger than that.

tasselhoff - 25 Aug 2021 18:45:20 (#18 of 155)

Paging Mr Fandango...

Verdigris - 25 Aug 2021 17:45:47 (#19 of 155)

Unless they can do warm air heating, perhaps.



They can, but with an old house you'll probably struggle with the ducting. You really need modern open web joists. In theory you could lift the slate, dig down, put in an insulated concrete slab incorporating underfloor heating pipes and the put the slates back. It would cost a bomb and you'd probably lose the will to live in the meantime.

Shadrack22 - 25 Aug 2021 18:47:44 (#20 of 155)

-10.

Thought it would be Anchorman.

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