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Started by Agaliarept on Dec 3, 2018 9:40:05 AM
Article 13: Should people be worried?

Haven't seen much in the way of threads mentioning this but what are posters thoughts on Article 13?

A few of my Brexity friends are pointing to this as evidence of the bad side of the EU. Is it as bad as a few FB articles are claiming?

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Agaliarept - 03 Dec 2018 09:41:40 (#1 of 20)

The article “creates an obligation on information society service providers storing and giving access to large amounts of works and other subject-matter uploaded by their users to take appropriate and proportionate measures to ensure the functioning of agreements concluded with rightsholders and to prevent the availability on their services of content identified by rightsholders in cooperation with the service providers.”

In other words, no authorization from the copyright holder, no rights to display on any websites or services.

https://petapixel.com/2018/06/23/article-13-in-the-eu-what-does-it-mean-for-photos/

In September the European Parliament voted on – and approved – an amended version of the EU copyright law that was rejected by the same body in July of this year.

Another troubling section is Article 11, known as the "link tax", which would require publishers and aggregate sites to pay a tax to sites to whom they link. This would mean Google would need to pay to list news stories and other websites on its search engine - a prospect it is definitely not very keen on.

https://www.alphr.com/politics/1009470/article-13-EU-what-is-it-copyright

Memes aside, one article points to the impact on public photography and linking to sites to defend an opinion.

These seem oddly restrictive.

Agaliarept - 03 Dec 2018 10:50:32 (#2 of 20)

Surprising no one has anything to say on this subject. Would be great to get some input.

KizzyK - 03 Dec 2018 10:54:20 (#3 of 20)

The only things I've seen on it have been from frothing younger gammons posting typical white boy incel memes tbh so its been hard to take seriously unfortunately though I grant you it will have some restrictive effects online.

Agaliarept - 03 Dec 2018 10:56:46 (#4 of 20)

The only things I've seen on it have been from frothing younger gammons posting typical white boy incel memes

Yeah there's a lot of that. I'm trying to see past that obvious tragedy to see whether some of the other stated claims are true.

thisonehasalittlehat - 03 Dec 2018 11:06:09 (#5 of 20)

My understanding is that it requires people to get copyright clearance for all materials in advance, rather than using takedown policies to manage copyright. This means that most youtube videos, for example, will not be accessible in the EU, and most youtube videos uploaded by people from EU will not be hosted by youtube. Personally I think it's overkill.

xDiggy - 03 Dec 2018 11:08:34 (#6 of 20)

It seems like an extremely poorly written and frankly unworkable piece of legislation, written by people with no grasp of the subject. Still not a good reason to throw ourselves off a cliff.

thisonehasalittlehat - 03 Dec 2018 11:09:06 (#7 of 20)

Take for example your typical gaming video. This will feature visuals and sound from videogames that are copyrighted. Many games companies are happy about these videos, as they promote the games. However, someone creating a gaming video would have to have the explicit approval of the games company in advance. More important the video hosting service would also need to be assured of that copyright agreement. Or take for example your typical mash-up of posted videos video - worst fails of 2018, or People Falling Over 6 - someone making that video would have to clear copyright not only for all the clips, but also for the music and for any incidental music that happens to be playing in the background. And google as owner of youtube would have to be assured of the copyright clearance of all that material.

The outcome of this is going to be that anything on youtube that isn't part of some official output of an existing media or entertainment company won't be available in the EU.

Agaliarept - 03 Dec 2018 11:21:16 (#8 of 20)

Personally I think it's overkill.

From what I read in the link, the current legislation seemed to be working fine. It just seems to be about getting a new revenue streat

The outcome of this is going to be that anything on youtube that isn't part of some official output of an existing media or entertainment company won't be available in the EU.

Seems pretty fascist if you ask me. Sort of thing going on in China.

KizzyK - 03 Dec 2018 11:37:07 (#9 of 20)

Its overkill but its not exactly hard to use a vpn is it? I do it all the time.

machiavelli - 03 Dec 2018 12:10:30 (#10 of 20)

It seems like an extremely poorly written and frankly unworkable piece of legislation, written by people with no grasp of the subject. Still not a good reason to throw ourselves off a cliff

You're the only one that mentioned Brexit.

mememe - 03 Dec 2018 12:12:12 (#11 of 20)

...well apart from the mention in the thread header.

AlanII - 03 Dec 2018 12:13:40 (#12 of 20)

And the one in post #10

phantlers - 03 Dec 2018 12:15:15 (#13 of 20)

The many links to this on Facebook and indeed youtube are inundated with references to Brexit in the respective btl commentary.

Agaliarept - 03 Dec 2018 12:18:06 (#14 of 20)

...well apart from the mention in the thread header.

Yeah, it was a Brexit voting friend that posted about this on FB.

It would be silly to deny a lot of Brexiters are talking about this..

diomu_II - 28 Mar 2019 13:48:47 (#15 of 20)

Just been reading about this on a Brexity thread, which said that Google Spain is shutting down its news service because a new law in Spain imposes the same sort of things, and it doesn't want to pay loads of newspapers to tell people where their sites can be found. Surely, I think, the newspapers themselves could do something on the interweb thingy whereby your first three articles are free, then you have to pay. If the same thing happens all over the EU, I'm not going to be able to google information about banking in Luxembourg, say...

diomu_II - 02 Apr 2019 15:45:50 (#16 of 20)

Connecting to Lib Gen now impossible here in Italy

TauCeti - 07 Apr 2019 22:19:27 (#17 of 20)

service providers storing and giving access to large amounts of works and other subject-matter uploaded by their users to take appropriate and proportionate measures

simply making officially illegal what has been going on for decades

Hilary - 04 Feb 2020 17:27:56 (#18 of 20)

And following Brexit:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-51240785

Article 13: UK will not implement EU copyright law

Universities and Science Minister Chris Skidmore has said that the UK will not implement the EU Copyright Directive after the country leaves the EU.

Several companies have criticised the law, which would hold them accountable for not removing copyrighted content uploaded by users, if it is passed.

EU member states have until 7 June 2021 to implement the new reforms, but the UK will have left the EU by then.

Hilary - 04 Feb 2020 17:28:28 (#19 of 20)

Indeed, it has left it already.

barkis - 04 Feb 2020 19:24:51 (#20 of 20)

So US companies will be free to rip off creative people in the UK.

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