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Started by OldLefty on Feb 12, 2020 5:08:02 PM
Giant dams enclosing North Sea could protect millions from rising waters
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OldLefty - 12 Feb 2020 17:08:16 (#1 of 108)

The cost looks quite reasonable compared to HS2. I'm sure the British government would pay for it if they called it the Boris Barrier.

Gotout - 12 Feb 2020 17:14:22 (#2 of 108)

All that lovely new land to build on, what's not to like?

indlovubill - 12 Feb 2020 17:38:05 (#3 of 108)

So we create a huge bath, then we turn the taps on as in there's a storm and all the rivers from Norway, Eastern UK, Northern France, Holland, Belgium, Denmark, Sweden...OK you get the picture.

mingmong - 12 Feb 2020 17:42:16 (#4 of 108)

I thought this was another Boris wheeze, so I clicked on the link preparing to point and laugh. Then I saw it was being proposed by a Dutch scientist, so I will now stroke my chin and ponder it seriously

JohnIlly - 12 Feb 2020 17:43:51 (#5 of 108)

The tidal power could generate a vast amount of electricity.

OldLefty - 12 Feb 2020 17:51:52 (#6 of 108)

I don't understand how the North Sea would turn into a freshwater lake, though. Surely the amount of salt would stay constant.

hailesaladdie - 12 Feb 2020 18:01:04 (#7 of 108)

It depends on the flow of the water. When the Afsluitdijk closed off the Zuiderzee to make the IJsselmeer, the salt was quickly washed out by the flow of all the rivers draining there.

But I think there are some similar places that remain brackish.

TheVoiceOfReason - 12 Feb 2020 18:03:08 (#8 of 108)

I too thought this sounded like a massive Boris wheeze, but on reading the article I am now filing it under “that’s so crazy it might just work”.

OldLefty - 12 Feb 2020 18:03:14 (#9 of 108)

But where would the North Sea salt wash out to? Water would evaporate, and be replaced by water from rivers, but the salt would remain.

TheVoiceOfReason - 12 Feb 2020 18:04:42 (#10 of 108)

And judging from the map, the Baltic would be enclosed as well. That’s a massive lake.

Arjuna - 12 Feb 2020 18:13:26 (#11 of 108)

Brexit means Brexit!

HorstVogel - 12 Feb 2020 18:17:30 (#12 of 108)

What if the Atlantic pops up the Avon and crosses over to the Thames? That'll bugger the plan up some what.

OldLefty - 12 Feb 2020 18:30:06 (#13 of 108)

Presumably they could adjust the level by letting water out when the level in the Atlantic was lower than the level in the lake, as long as they didn't want the level to be lower than low tide.

JDW70Wellwhynot - 12 Feb 2020 19:07:50 (#14 of 108)

Maybe it would be cheaper to build bunds around house, towns, fields...

OldLefty - 12 Feb 2020 19:11:47 (#15 of 108)

I think #13 may have answered my own question. If the flow of water was always from the lake into the Atlantic, the salinity level would gradually decrease.

indlovubill - 12 Feb 2020 19:12:00 (#16 of 108)

I don't want to be a damned nuisance but wouldn't blocking off the world's busiest shipping lanes be something of a problem? Presumably the water on the ocean side would be a lot higher which also fucks up the idea of tidal generation, unless you're letting the water in which tather fucks up the idea of having a dam in the first place.

Tagyourit - 12 Feb 2020 19:19:31 (#17 of 108)

but wouldn't blocking off the world's busiest shipping lanes be something of a problem?

You could, I suppose build shipping canals like the Panama canal across NE Scotland from Castletown to Nybster and one across Brittany from Brest to Roscoff, you'd need a series of huge locks to deal with the difference in sea level between the Atlantic and the Great Euro Lake but that's just big engineering.

TheVoiceOfReason - 12 Feb 2020 19:21:37 (#18 of 108)

wouldn't blocking off the world's busiest shipping lanes be something of a problem

ISTR reading somewhere that they’re building a super high speed train from Guangzhou to Moscow so if it were extended a bit that would solve that problem. We could also build a high speed from Galway to Liverpool (to link up with NPR and HS2) under the Irish Sea. And of course 3D printing is going to bring most manufacture back onshore in any case.

indlovubill - 12 Feb 2020 19:41:17 (#19 of 108)

ISTR reading somewhere that they’re building a super high speed train from Guangzhou to Moscow so if it were extended a bit that would solve that problem.



Some fucking railway, around 10,000,000 tonnes a day pass through the English Channel!

TheVoiceOfReason - 12 Feb 2020 19:45:32 (#20 of 108)

It was that sort of doomsday thinking that stopped Boris Island! You need to believe.

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