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Started by TheVoiceOfReason on Oct 3, 2020 8:35:32 AM
France plans to “rid society” of radical Muslims

The French president, Emmanuel Macron, says he hopes to rid France of what authorities call a “parallel society” of radical Muslims who, in his words, thrive outside the values of the nation.

The French president announced a series of measures on Friday in a proposed new law to “defend the republic and its values and ensure it respects its promise of equality and emancipation.”

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/ma
cron-france-islam-speech-seperatism-religion-b746835.html

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SharkPatoo - 03 Oct 2020 08:37:10 (#1 of 487)

Oh you are naughty, TVOR.

barkis - 03 Oct 2020 09:25:17 (#2 of 487)

He also spoke of freeing Islam in France from “foreign influences”



Presumably when he's done that he'll do the same for Catholicism.

bailliegillies - 03 Oct 2020 10:57:55 (#3 of 487)

Presumably when he's done that he'll do the same for Catholicism.



I think they did that during their revolutions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Constitution_o
f_the_Clergy

machiavelli - 03 Oct 2020 11:01:43 (#4 of 487)

He blamed France itself for organising the “ghettoization” of a population that could easily fall prey to the preaching of some radical Muslims who may substitute their laws for those of the nation.

So France deliberately stuffed ethnic minorities into ghettos?

barkis - 03 Oct 2020 11:02:12 (#5 of 487)

#3

I don& #39;t think revolutionary and Napoleonic laws survived the Bourbon restoration.

machiavelli - 03 Oct 2020 11:06:52 (#6 of 487)

I In the proposal, associations, which currently receive state funding, would be forced to be transparent about their spending and their often invisible leaders. They would also have to reimburse any misused funds

Fair enough

and if found to be pushing ideas not aligned with the republic, they could be ordered to disband

I see that freedom of association isn't a core value of the French state. Of course, this sort of law can be used against anyone the state doesn't like.

kvelertak - 03 Oct 2020 11:07:12 (#7 of 487)

#4 Both conscious and unconscious bias have been drivers of relative economic marginalisation, and low income is a driver of locating in the banlieus. France has structural racism no more or less than Britain has, the fine details of the manifestations may differ.

kvelertak - 03 Oct 2020 11:09:15 (#8 of 487)

But thank you, Patters, for adding to the mischief of the boards, we should give you a banlieu of your very own ;-)

barkis - 03 Oct 2020 11:11:26 (#9 of 487)

"ideas not aligned with the republic" seems very similar to "unamerican", the term beloved of Senator McCarthy.

kvelertak - 03 Oct 2020 11:18:01 (#10 of 487)

We're going to see a lot more of that kind of rhetoric here in the UK after January 1st, the culprits will continue to pull out all the stops to 'legitimise' themselves.

guigal - 03 Oct 2020 11:24:26 (#11 of 487)

France and the UK have the same problem of unlicensed religious schools --not only Muslim.

AdonisBlue - 03 Oct 2020 11:30:30 (#12 of 487)

In the UK the religious schools are now very much licensed. Since the tories allowed independent schools to set up there's been an increase in educational ghettoisation.

guigal - 03 Oct 2020 11:32:37 (#13 of 487)

It's not a new problem either.

Counter-terrorism officers have raided an unlicensed Islamic school operating out of a back street in east London with links to the extremist group al-Muhajiroun and a controversial Islamic radical. (The Guardian, 2014)

guigal - 03 Oct 2020 11:49:16 (#14 of 487)

There is no justification for state support for segregated education, based on religious faith, in England or in France - or anywhere.

In January 2019, there were 6,802 state funded faith schools in England (around 34% of all state-funded mainstream schools). House of Commons Library Briefing Paper Number 06972, 20 December 2019 Faith Schools in England)

Discrimination by mainstream Catholic and C of E schools does not deserve state support. But surely there can be no argument about closing schools, run by fundamentalists, which operate illegally.

tasselhoff - 03 Oct 2020 11:55:44 (#15 of 487)

I don& #39;t think revolutionary and Napoleonic laws survived the Bourbon restoration

Napoleon basically hand-wrote the entire code civil.

machiavelli - 03 Oct 2020 12:03:35 (#16 of 487)

There is no justification for state support for segregated education, based on religious faith, in England or in France - or anywhere.

I'm not fond of it. Given the general lack of belief in the UK, I'm surprised at it's persistence.

barkis - 03 Oct 2020 12:10:34 (#17 of 487)

#15

It seems you're right that the Napoleonic code survived the restoration, though I doubt a man who was poorly educated in non-military matters hand-wrote a code based on the Roman law of Justinian. Anyway, it's a digression (though an interesting one)from my original point about the papacy.

tasselhoff - 03 Oct 2020 12:18:52 (#18 of 487)

After multiple rejected drafts by other commissions, a fresh start was made after Napoleon came to power in 1799. A commission of four eminent jurists was appointed in 1800, including Louis-Joseph Fauré and chaired by Cambacérès (now Second Consul), and sometimes by the First Consul, Napoleon himself.

It's obviously been amended a lot since, but he was the one who pushed for it and actually dived into it himself (although he didn't do it all on his ownsome).

barkis - 03 Oct 2020 12:25:27 (#19 of 487)

#18

In what sense did Napoleon "dive into it himself"?

tasselhoff - 03 Oct 2020 12:28:51 (#20 of 487)

He was involved with the jurists in writing it up, apparently.

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