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Started by Tripos on Jan 19, 2019 5:09:38 AM
Films that changed your life

They might not be great Films. They might even be really really bad films. They might not be films you are currently watching. I guess it could also include "straight to" DVD/Blu-Ray films and films/plays made for TV. But what changed your life? I'll start with this one: The Matrix (1999)

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lammaMia - 20 Jan 2019 06:42:06 (#1 of 54)

La strada (1954)

La promesse (1996)

Le bonheur (1965)

Sullivan's travels (1941)

MorrisMitchener - 20 Jan 2019 12:44:18 (#2 of 54)

Monty Python and the Holy Grail. I never laughed as hard before or since as I did the first time I saw it. I can't have been more than 10.

uranrising - 20 Jan 2019 12:44:54 (#3 of 54)

Being taken to see the Polish film Kanal and discovering that films could be made anywhere outside Hollywood and Elstree i.e. Anglo-Saxonlandland.

RosyLovelady - 20 Jan 2019 12:57:27 (#4 of 54)

In what way did Le Bonheur change you life, Iamma?

It's many years since I saw it, and it struck me then as nice looking but deeply unpleasant.

lammaMia - 20 Jan 2019 20:35:03 (#5 of 54)

It is difficult to talk about it without spoilers. The end is definitely provocative.

What did you find deeply unpleasant, Rosy?

RosyLovelady - 21 Jan 2019 08:38:23 (#6 of 54)

As you say, difficult without spoilers--and I last saw it in 1967 and may have missed the point of the idyllic ending.

The message I got at the end was that it's a man's irresponsible, guilt-free world.

widenation - 23 Jan 2019 17:01:33 (#7 of 54)

The Good The Bad & The Ugly. Saw maybe 30-40 minutes of it in a Dixons store aged about 7 - so probably without sound - but was still transfixed. Not life-changing but made a big impression.

thisonehasalittlehat - 23 Jan 2019 17:13:04 (#8 of 54)

I don't think a film has ever changed my life and I can't imagine what sort of film would. Which maybe it's a failing in me.

widenation - 23 Jan 2019 17:23:53 (#9 of 54)

I possibly taught myself the banjo due to Deliverance. ...But learning the banjo hasn't really changed my life.

Intowntonight - 23 Jan 2019 17:28:37 (#10 of 54)

Schindlers List, and 12 Years A Slave:

what the world can do you if you don't have any power.

Rendered - 23 Jan 2019 18:59:19 (#11 of 54)

The Cook, the Thief, his Wife and her Lover seen at the cinema as a fifteen year old. Nothing has had the same effect since. And not just because well-cooked booksellers are rarely seen on screen.

fogger - 23 Jan 2019 19:42:08 (#12 of 54)

Major League. Taught me the joy of pointless swearing.

FGBFGB - 23 Jan 2019 20:27:42 (#13 of 54)

'Fourteen Days in May'. Never a more powerful condemnation of the death penalty.

uranrising - 23 Jan 2019 20:56:55 (#14 of 54)

Apart from 12 Angry Men.

Sabacious - 23 Jan 2019 21:07:15 (#15 of 54)

14 days in May is an extraordinary film and never forgotten once watched.

TheSwearingBear - 29 Jan 2019 12:52:42 (#16 of 54)

Wake in Fright. It made me want to make films.

lammaMia - 29 Jan 2019 21:09:04 (#17 of 54)

#6: I didn't think I was supposed to agree with the ending of Le bonheur.

Agnes Varda turned ninety last year and she is still making movies. God bless her!

lammaMia - 29 Jan 2019 21:26:14 (#18 of 54)

Do you expect a French intellectual type to title a film 'Happiness' and then make a movie about happiness?

Tadagee - 29 Jan 2019 21:27:49 (#19 of 54)

To Kill a Mockingbird.

Saw aged 15 and decided I was going to be a criminal law defence guy just like Atticus Finch.

Note to younger self: It's really not much like being Atticus Finch.

thisonehasalittlehat - 30 Jan 2019 18:29:19 (#20 of 54)

I read the book.

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