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Started by Catspyjamas17 on Oct 16, 2019 11:57:43 AM
The Vegan Thread

Whether you are vegan, vegetarian, pescetarian or just trying to cut down on meat and dairy, trying to life a healthier and/or more environmentally friendly lifestyle this is a place to try, and discuss, new foods and recipes.

Catspyjamas17 - 10 Jan 2020 19:42:16 (#241 of 530)

That never usually works for me. I don't normally weigh myself more frequently than once a week (and usually less often), but just wanted to see if it was working after a few days, and I always weigh myself in the morning and on the same scales.

artant - 10 Jan 2020 23:26:29 (#242 of 530)

For dinner this evening, I had the remains of the lentil soup I made the other day. Realised as I finished it that I’d added the crispy kale but forgotten all about the (soy) yoghurt. I did stir in some spinach when I reheated the soup though so extra veg.

I think soup is going to be a bit of a regular feature for me now that I have a soup maker (I realise soup is simple to make anyway but being able to wander off and do other things makes it extra convenient and so far the results have been great).

I’m still vegetarian rather than vegan but I think it’s only a matter of time. In the meanwhile, a few vegan days a week are at least a start.

uranrising - 10 Jan 2020 23:30:51 (#243 of 530)

Good on ya.

Catspyjamas17 - 10 Jan 2020 23:39:00 (#244 of 530)

I’m still vegetarian rather than vegan but I think it’s only a matter of time.

Pescetarian and gradually moving to vegan for me. It's only fish and eggs to go now really but those are big ones.

esmeralda - 11 Jan 2020 09:18:01 (#245 of 530)

Butterfly complaining about "mush" really made me think ... realised that what makes a favourite recipe for me (apart from flavour) is varied texture. Which is why the whole "buddha bowl" thing works. This:

https://www.abelandcole.co.uk/recipes/speedy-fragrant-carrot-cashew-ginger-curry

has nuts in, which are chewy and also the carrots cooked separately so still with some "bite".

Cooked the first time from Green Roasting Tin last night - polenta/sweet potato & mushroom. Even with salad on the side, there still wasn't enough variety of texture. I should have overcooked it till it was much crispier. And if I'm using other recipes from the book, need to think more about garnishes.

southwesterly - 11 Jan 2020 09:46:16 (#246 of 530)

I like vegan bowls too. I find they need a really nice sauce or gravy to come together.

For mushy things such as a veggie chili, I find that having them with potatoes automatically increases the satisfaction level and texture. I have an air fryer, so I can cook really nice fat-free chips or roast potatoes / sweet potatoes in 25 minutes or so, so this is no harder than cooking rice. It generally works out at fewer calories than rice and more minerals, I think. So long as there are potatoes, I am rarely dissatisfied.

southwesterly - 11 Jan 2020 09:50:57 (#247 of 530)

I also think that for me, one source of occasional dissatisfaction is that I am craving fats without realising it. I find that it is very easy to eat almost totally fat-free, especially if you use a spray oil for cooking. A handful of nuts always make feel immediately well, and I suspect that is because of the fat that the body needs.

butterflyeffect - 11 Jan 2020 10:11:23 (#248 of 530)

You are almost certainly right, southwesterly, after moaning yesterday I had an M&S plant kitchen chocolate pot, which is largely coconut cream, and felt instantly better!

southwesterly - 11 Jan 2020 10:17:23 (#249 of 530)

I suspect this is the reason why I was so craving sour cream the other day.

Catspyjamas17 - 11 Jan 2020 11:06:13 (#250 of 530)

Plain tortilla chips are usually vegan and can add a bit of crunch to a chilli.

artant - 11 Jan 2020 20:00:54 (#251 of 530)

I made beet bourguinon this evening for the first time in ages. It could do with a bit longer (everything else was ready before the beetroot was quite as done as it could be) but very tasty nonetheless.

BasilSeal - 11 Jan 2020 20:22:09 (#252 of 530)

On another topic, I'm quite surprised that the majority of vegan foods on sale don't seem to be organic, at least where I live.



It's very difficult to grow stuff organically without manure, growing things depletes the fertility of the soil, you have to replace that somehow, so livestock are an essential part of maintaining soil health in an organic system.

I've also noticed that our local super market has discontinued a lot of the organic lines we buy to make room for plant based foods. whilst for the organic movement, soil health is the primary motivation, for the retailers, organics is simply a value added brand, they will view vegan in a similar way so one usurps the other as, and whilst i dislike the expression i can't think of a better one, the 'virtue signalling' brand of choice.

As i see someone else observed upthread, most of the new vegan foods appearing in the shops are highly processed meat substitutes etc, rather than healthy raw ingredients.

southwesterly - 11 Jan 2020 20:27:52 (#253 of 530)

I am glad that I learned how to be vegetarian (even if I have by no means always implemented it strictly) from vegan friends 25 years ago. It must be very tempting for new vegetarians to rely on the processed meat replacement stuff. One of the things I most like about old-fashioned vegan/veggie cooking is that it is so cheap. Perfect for daily home cooking, even if you allow yourself to lapse when out of the house, etc.

MaryMC - 11 Jan 2020 20:49:55 (#254 of 530)

It's very difficult to grow stuff organically without manure, growing things depletes the fertility of the soil, you have to replace that somehow, so livestock are an essential part of maintaining soil health in an organic system.

I would have no objection to the use of manure; I buy organic fruit and veg mainly in the hope of avoiding pesticides.

for the retailers, organics is simply a value added brand, they will view vegan in a similar way so one usurps the other as, and whilst i dislike the expression i can't think of a better one, the 'virtue signalling' brand of choice.

Yes, I'm sure you're absolutely right.

As i see someone else observed upthread, most of the new vegan foods appearing in the shops are highly processed meat substitutes etc, rather than healthy raw ingredients.

Yes, which is why I rarely buy them, and only from a local shop that stocks organic brands.

I'm only vegetarian, though, not full-on vegan, so I can get protein from dairy products.

MaryMC - 11 Jan 2020 20:55:37 (#255 of 530)

I thought this was interesting:

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2019/jan/
12/were-humus-sapiens-the-farmers-who-shun-animal-manure


I must admit it hadn't occurred to me that animal manure may contain antibiotic residues.

artant - 11 Jan 2020 21:36:04 (#256 of 530)

That’s really interesting. I saw something else about manure meaning vegetables aren’t really vegan the other day and kind of added it to the list of things that seem to be a step too far for me to really think about them (I try to focus on seasonality, avoid anything that’s been air freighted and buy organic when I can and that feels like enough to be going on with) but the idea that vegetable compost can actually yield more is great.

artant - 11 Jan 2020 21:36:48 (#257 of 530)

I also hadn’t considered the possibility of antibiotic residues.

carterbrandon - 11 Jan 2020 21:41:44 (#258 of 530)

most of the new vegan foods appearing in the shops are highly processed meat substitutes etc, rather than healthy raw ingredients.

I'm reminded of the episode of Adam Curtis's 'The Century of the Self' about how the 1960s counterculture, rather than achieving its aim of overthrowing consumerism via a new mode of thought, was in fact assimilated and co-opted into it.

" (So you want to be one of these cool new hippies? Well, buy these things and you will be....)"

artant - 11 Jan 2020 21:50:42 (#259 of 530)

I think I went 15-20 years as a vegetarian without ever using fake meat before deciding that there’s a place for it (I’m not sure what changed really). I don’t use it often but I do usually have some tofu sausages in the fridge.

BasilSeal - 12 Jan 2020 00:01:02 (#260 of 530)

I must admit it hadn't occurred to me that animal manure may contain antibiotic residues.



if you think about it, if you take any drug it has to pass out of your body, primarily via urine and faeces, (or milk, if you happen to be lactating), so yes manure can potentially contain antibiotic residues. (also potentially pesticide residues, where animals have eaten crops treated with certain chemicals that can pass through the gut, which is why bob Flowerdew recommends sourcing manure from organic farms for your garden on GQT) Animal madicines have with hold periods for meat and milk to prevent contamination of food, but obviously manure just comes out as normal.

In practice though on European farms routine use of antibiotics is banned, so cattle would only be treated if they were sick, hence the chance of contamination is a negligible consideration. The article is interesting but essentially they're just using a woodchip compost which is nothing revolutionary. we've been using wood chip from thinnings to bed cattle and the resulting composted manure is fantastic for soil condition, we've used it in the veg garden and the results are astounding. all you're doing though is increasing the organic matter in the soil and hence its ability to retain moisture and nutrients.

I'm reminded of the episode of Adam Curtis's 'The Century of the Self' about how the 1960s counterculture, rather than achieving its aim of overthrowing consumerism via a new mode of thought, was in fact assimilated and co-opted into it.



Indeed. this is true for veganism and for organics before it, they seek to subvert the way in which we consume and produce food but have to exist within the existing paradigm of food production.

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