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Started by Shadrack22 on Oct 11, 2021 12:42:54 PM
Why did Labour lose the 1970 general election?

In 1966 Labour gained 48 seats, taking them up to 363. The Conservatives lost 51 seats, leaving them with 253. Wilson now had a majority of 96. He could look forward to governing for a full Parliament and working towards his ambition of making Labour the natural party of government.

What went wrong in 1970?

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RosyLovelady - 11 Oct 2021 12:44:30 (#1 of 75)

Harold Wilson's complacency done for Labour, or so the story went at the time.

RosyLovelady - 11 Oct 2021 12:46:39 (#2 of 75)

And Tony Benn had silenced all broadcasting from the much loved pirate radio ships.

whitbreadtrophy - 11 Oct 2021 13:08:41 (#3 of 75)

For those who haven't seen it, If Banks Had Played.

http://web.archive.org/web/20071212170442/http://w
ww.btinternet.com/~chief.gnome/

Lawlsie - 11 Oct 2021 13:17:06 (#4 of 75)

Devaluation in 1967.

Poor balance of trade figures released just days before the election.

Wilson acting like a president.

Complacency. Wilson really assumed he would win and it was just a formality.

Union unrest. In Place Of Strife traduced.

A still very socially conservative country uneasy with social reforms passed by the government. The 60s weren't that revolutionary.

Shadrack22 - 11 Oct 2021 13:21:13 (#5 of 75)

The tax man's taken all my dough

And left me in my stately home

Lazin' on a sunny afternoon

And I can't sail my yacht

He's taken everything I got

All I've got's this sunny afternoon

Shadrack22 - 11 Oct 2021 13:22:53 (#6 of 75)

A still very socially conservative country uneasy with social reforms passed by the government.

Very interesting. Not an angle I’d ever considered. It would be interesting to know how much opposition there was to the Jenkins liberalisations.

Lawlsie - 11 Oct 2021 13:23:22 (#7 of 75)

#5 See also Harrison's Taxman off Revolver, 1966

RosyLovelady - 11 Oct 2021 13:23:56 (#8 of 75)

1966, when these tunes were current, was the year of the Labour landslide.

Shadrack22 - 11 Oct 2021 13:24:57 (#9 of 75)

George must have had a classical education:

Now my advice for those who die (taxman)

Declare the pennies on your eyes (taxman)

xDiggy - 11 Oct 2021 13:26:27 (#10 of 75)

I'm pleased to see it took only three posts to blame Peter Bonetti.

Lawlsie - 11 Oct 2021 13:27:07 (#11 of 75)

Very interesting. Not an angle I’d ever considered. It would be interesting to know how much opposition there was to the Jenkins liberalisations

Lots! The 60s didn't swing for most of the country. Jenkins was quite right to pursue his socially-liberal agenda. Wilson wasn't that bothered about it. He said when he stepped down in 1976 that the one achievement he most wanted to be remembered for was the Open University. Tho the credit for that really belongs with Jennie Lee.

upgoerfive - 11 Oct 2021 13:27:53 (#12 of 75)

The Tories were starting to master modern public relations at the time. Slick Party Political Broadcasts on the TV, and a punchy poster campaign:

https://tinyurl.com/xsvj8zyr

Lawlsie - 11 Oct 2021 13:28:52 (#13 of 75)

George must have had a classical education

He went to a grammar school. I think all The Beatles did. Not sure about Ringo who missed a lot of school due to childhood illness

Lawlsie - 11 Oct 2021 13:30:17 (#14 of 75)

The Tories were starting to master modern public relations at the time. Slick Party Political Broadcasts on the TV, and a punchy poster campaign

And Heath was the first leader who was elected and called Grocer Ted due to his far more ordinary background than previous Tory leaders.

RosyLovelady - 11 Oct 2021 13:30:53 (#15 of 75)

Anyway, it's always fun to be lectured on one's past by those who weren't there.

Freeview Channel 11 is also good for this.

breakfast - 11 Oct 2021 13:37:52 (#16 of 75)

Was “Sunny Afternoon” not ironic? Poor fella being left in his stately home?

Or was there a definite George Harrison vibe?

Shadrack22 - 11 Oct 2021 13:40:51 (#17 of 75)

Yes ironic, but Ray Davies’ first wife was from Bradford. He spent time there in the mid-60s and was very aware that much of Britain wasn’t swinging, was still recovering from the war. (See Dead End Street).

cozzer - 11 Oct 2021 13:41:49 (#18 of 75)

Was “Sunny Afternoon” not ironic? Poor fella being left in his stately home?

I've always assumed so. A response to Taxman.

Agaliarept - 11 Oct 2021 14:04:32 (#19 of 75)

With Ray's words:

https://faroutmagazine.co.uk/the-kinks-sunny-afternoon-story-behind-the-song/

Lawlsie - 11 Oct 2021 14:51:39 (#20 of 75)

A Waterloo sunset is quite something. Black skyline against a brilliant red sky.

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