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Started by bossab2 on Jan 21, 2021 4:32:52 PM
Latest must have gadget ?
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helbel - 21 Jan 2021 16:33:39 (#1 of 51)

Mine arrived today. My SpO2 is normal.

helbel - 21 Jan 2021 16:35:57 (#2 of 51)

Ordered it yesterday after hearing how one saved the life of my colleagues father - they wouldn’t have sent an ambulance for him otherwise (and they’d been waiting 7 hours), but luckily my colleague had sent one to her parents and the reading was so low they admitted him to hospital.

thisonehasalittlehat - 21 Jan 2021 16:53:11 (#3 of 51)

Use your phone?

Verdigris - 21 Jan 2021 17:07:32 (#4 of 51)

I've been checking my sats and temperature, daily, for about a year. I'm on my second set of batteries in the oximeter.

The item on Inside Health is well worth listening to.

The phone apps aren't recommended.

Verdigris - 21 Jan 2021 17:14:26 (#5 of 51)

Why is this in IT & Computers?

Modz, plz delete and ban OP.

hailesaladdie - 21 Jan 2021 18:20:49 (#6 of 51)

Oh, why couldn't these have been around when I was having panic attacks? Great they're widely available. The "breathing phase" of Covid was a horrible experience.

Moschops - 21 Jan 2021 18:26:08 (#7 of 51)

MrsChops bought one in lockdown 1. I can report 96% on the blood oxygen reading

Verdigris - 21 Jan 2021 18:29:59 (#8 of 51)

I don't understand why they've taken so long to come to this conclusion. The "happy hypoxic" syndrome was noted very early on in the pandemic and prompted me to get an oximeter because the cough and raised temperature were not reliable signs of infection.

quattrobhoy - 21 Jan 2021 23:18:47 (#9 of 51)

Certain smart wearables - e.g. watches and fitness bands - will measure both heart rate and blood oxygen levels, possibly even in a continuous basis and during sleep.

Had I had such a device three years ago, I'd probably have reason to present myself sooner to my GP - to find that I had had pneumonia. IIRC my blood oxygen was less than 93%.

Policywatcher - 22 Jan 2021 21:41:15 (#10 of 51)

> hailesaladdie - 21 Jan 2021 18:20:49 ( #6 of 9)

> Oh, why couldn't these have been around when

They've been around (in a bit simpler form, but around) for some years now, and some people with sleep apnoea. "Sleepyhead", the popular free app for displaying user records from CPAP machines, has also supported the readings of some makes of these for ages, and displays both sets of results integrated.

COVID has though made them more visible to the general public, and increased usage has probably helped bring the prices down.

Policywatcher - 22 Jan 2021 21:47:12 (#11 of 51)

> quattrobhoy - 21 Jan 2021 23:18:47 ( #9 of 9)

> Certain smart wearables - e.g. watches and fitness bands - will measure both heart rate and blood oxygen levels, possibly even in a continuous basis and during sleep.

possibly

Some models however only show relative changes in SPO2, some only show it if you take the monthly paid subscription... And some only collect it when a particular watch face is running.

The other thing I've recently found about from Fitbit is HRV - the degree to which your heart beat timings are slightly irregular.

Measured in mS of average variability.

Counter-intuitively, high variability is good, and low variability (below 25mS) is NOT GOOD - can be associated both with raised risk of stroke and severity of outcome of a stroke.

Delighted_User - 22 Jan 2021 22:49:49 (#12 of 51)

I don't understand why they've taken so long to come to this conclusion. The "happy hypoxic" syndrome was noted very early on in the pandemic and prompted me to get an oximeter because the cough and raised temperature were not reliable signs of infection.

Neither do I. Until about a week ago low sats weren't enough on their own to get you an emergency ambulance, despite the early warning.

Verdigris - 23 Jan 2021 00:14:35 (#13 of 51)

When I got my flu jab, last autumn, the doctor asked me about general health etc. When I quoted my sats for that day he was impressed that I'd taken the information on board and agreed that low sats was the most reliable indicator of trouble.

BigJoe - 30 Dec 2021 11:43:27 (#14 of 51)

I've been using a Fitbit for about 10 years, my current one is a One. I'm musing on replacing it and it's between the Inspire 2 or maybe even the Charge 5 (or 4).

I like that I could use either to monitor heart rate when walking and maybe even my sleep.

I prefer to wear it on the belt but would swap to wrist for (occasional) heart and sleep monitoring. I feel I would miss the floors climbed which I2 doesn't seem to do, but the C5 (/4) seems only to work on the wrist.

I think I've all but persuaded myself that if the One does die, or I decide I do need to see my heart rate, the Inspire 2 is going to fit my needs, and I'll have to sacrifice the floors climbed.

Any warnings / advice on my next toy?

artant - 03 Jan 2022 01:21:35 (#15 of 51)

My experience of Fitbits is that the One was a bloody brilliant device; it was easy to lose but otherwise indestructible (I put one through the wash a couple of times with no ill effects). Wrist-based Fitbits are altogether less impressive: my Charge was replaced three or four times under warranty (there was a serious design flaw with the strap which Fitbit refused to acknowledge as a problem even though the devices seemed to last a few months at most). The newer ones are better but temperamental (I had one that refused to count my steps if I had my coat on, for instance) and nothing like as accurate as the One at actually counting steps, in my experience.

The Fitbit app is great though.

BigJoe - 03 Jan 2022 09:21:17 (#16 of 51)

Yes, I love it and the others aren't really measuring up. I have lost it once or twice when gardening but walking around the garden with my phone trying to sync it helped find it!

Lil'Jo has a Garmin (xmas pressie from the Jo-ettes a few years back) and it does the heart rate thing when she's walking so that is what's tempted me but only to use occasionally, else it's back on the belt.

It annoyed me that floors is missing from one and heart rate from the other and only one goes on the belt but you have to cough up another $30 for the clip.

Given that I almost always have my iPhone on my person I think when the One finally carks it I may just move to pulling the data from the phone.

Thanks Art, I think you've talked me out of it.

Now I need someone to tell me why I shouldn't sell my 15+ yo (2nd hand) Yamaha AV Receiver and buy a shiny new Marantz PM6007 Stereo Amp - I've finally taken my turntable out of moth balls and am having a new laser fitted to the CD player - Lil'Jo has been on at me for (er years) to set my hi-fi back up.

HoHoHoff - 03 Jan 2022 09:26:13 (#17 of 51)

I got the PM6007 last year and don't regret it.

Tenesmus - 03 Jan 2022 09:26:38 (#18 of 51)

Why replace the amp?

OneOfOne - 03 Jan 2022 10:22:14 (#19 of 51)

I have a Samsung smart watch and it's great. Monitors me HR periodically and does my laps in the pool. I swim in the sea and it's super handy to know how long I've been in (to be fair any waterproof casio would suffice for that)

The HR function is apparently not as reliable as a proper chest strap one, so I'll take some of the measurements with a pinch of salt, such as the reported 203 bpm during an exercise class!

BigJoe - 03 Jan 2022 10:52:30 (#20 of 51)

Why replace the amp?

While chatting with the shop chap about my CD player issue (& replacement stylus), he planted the thought that an AV receiver wouldn't be as good as a stereo amplifier as I'm not using it for surround sound just vinyl and CDs.

Just not sure if these ears would notice, or if I'll regret not being able connect it via BT or some such at a later date.

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