No smilies, no avatars, no flashing gifs. Just discuss the issues of the day, from last night's telly via football to science or philosophy.
Started by mikeshadow on Mar 28, 2016 12:36:44 AM
Old tech systems causing established banks' outages

We've gone mobile and online. We expect real-time transactions and access to financial services around the clock.

The new computer systems and programming languages designed to cope with this fundamental shift in our behaviour don't interact well with the old, slower back-office systems.

"For the next five years - and we're talking globally - every incumbent banking player who's been around for a while will have an increased risk of outages," says Julian Skan, managing director of financial services at consultancy Accenture.

"Very often banking groups that have grown by acquisition have never fully integrated their systems," says Mr Skan.

"When a bank reaches a certain size it becomes too risky to change the core technology, so you build layers on top, and that adds complexity."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-35880429

Previous
|
Next
|
Top
|
Bottom
Post deleted by user
InternationalVicar - 28 Mar 2016 02:24:30 (#2 of 18)

Avoid the ones with the worst legacy by acquisition - you know who.

Sit back and let others reveal the weaknesses in the new.

And maybe, as per deleted post, ignore anyone who uses the word 'player' out of context.

HerrWalrus - 28 Mar 2016 09:07:21 (#3 of 18)

Load of tosh in that article. Does the writer (who appears to be their tech editor) even understand the difference between server-side and client-side software?

CarlosFandango - 28 Mar 2016 09:24:49 (#4 of 18)

I'm moving away from electronic money, as it happens. So passé.

I'm forced to use it for some things of course, but for day-to-day stuff it's cash and a 'local currency' as much as possible.

InternationalVicar - 28 Mar 2016 10:57:25 (#5 of 18)

The danger is that when cash transactions drop below a certain percentage there will be a drive to eliminate it altogether.

Gotout - 28 Mar 2016 11:42:25 (#6 of 18)

"When a bank reaches a certain size it becomes too risky to change the core technology"





Is that why a lot of cash machines are still running XP?

inandout - 28 Mar 2016 11:45:35 (#7 of 18)

Lloyds have been upgrading to Win 7 in the last few months.

Gotout - 28 Mar 2016 11:46:36 (#8 of 18)

I wonder why they don't all use Linux?

mikeshadow - 15 Jun 2018 18:56:43 (#9 of 18)

These outages are still happening. The latest being the disaster of TSB changing from the old Lloyds Bank's system to its new owner's system.

InternationalVicar - 15 Jun 2018 21:20:29 (#10 of 18)

They do use linux, but its just another layer of accretion on the old.

uranrising - 15 Jun 2018 21:20:41 (#11 of 18)

The danger is that when cash transactions drop below a certain percentage there will be a drive to eliminate it altogether.

So do more and more of them.

InternationalVicar - 15 Jun 2018 21:24:28 (#12 of 18)

The Visa thing helped. The idea that the new world of cyber warfare can shut everything down in an instant will help too

mememe - 15 Jun 2018 21:48:50 (#13 of 18)

Fun fact: there's more cash in circulation in the Eurozone, and indeed in the world, than ever before.

mikeshadow - 27 Aug 2019 18:29:38 (#14 of 18)

RBS and NatWest were down again today.

Both websites were out of action from 09:00 BST. In RBS' case the disruption lasted seven hours, while Natwest's online banking was down for nine hours.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-49482706

barkis - 27 Aug 2019 18:35:07 (#15 of 18)

"Everything is stored securely in the Microsoft Azure cloud"



Really? No-one will ever hack Azure?

Tenesmus - 27 Aug 2019 18:36:53 (#16 of 18)

It's azure thing.

levelgaze - 27 Aug 2019 18:45:43 (#17 of 18)

Get Macs. Problem solved.

HerrWalrus - 27 Aug 2019 19:06:49 (#18 of 18)

Unless they are unusable, all computer systems can be hacked.

Previous
|
Next
|
Top
|
Bottom
Check Subscriptions
|
Home » Money