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Started by diomu_II on Feb 27, 2011 11:53:02 PM
Classical what are you listening to?

As long as it's not Mahler, of course...

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Columba3 - 01 Mar 2011 11:04:55 (#1 of 4262)

At present I'm very much into Schubert. Quite by accident I discovered his piano duets. A month or so ago I heard the Fantasy in F Minor D 940 on BBC Radio 3. It was new to me and since then I've bought three CDs of his duets. The Rondo in D Major D 608 is one of the most tuneful pieces of music I've ever encountered. It makes you want to dance all around your living room. I had to order the CDs from America.

Columba3 - 01 Mar 2011 11:23:41 (#2 of 4262)

http://tinyurl.com/624xa9l

This is one of the recordings I have and it gives you a chance to have a pre-hearing.

You'll have to paste the URL into your browser

rainwoman - 01 Mar 2011 20:22:59 (#3 of 4262)

Thought threadsters here might like this:



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7o7BrlbaDs&fea
ture=youtube_gdata_player


Sorry - another link that needs pasting.

Cavewoman - 03 Mar 2011 23:44:24 (#4 of 4262)

Columba3 - I love Schubert and Mozart piano. I have a wonderful recording of the Schubert D 940 played by Murray Perahia and Radu Lupu, paired with Mozart's Sonata for 2 Pianos, K. 448. That recording, and Schubert's last 3 great piano sonatas played by Brendel, accompany me wherever I go, on my MP3 player. All of them (performed by various artistes) have sustained me for nearly 60 years and I'm still learning about them.

Cavewoman - 03 Mar 2011 23:46:27 (#5 of 4262)

Columba3 and rainwoman - each of your links appeared as grabbable - no need to cut & paste.

diomu_II - 04 Mar 2011 10:06:16 (#6 of 4262)

Columba, where have you been and what have you been up to? (Not being nosey, of course...)

aegiandyad - 05 Mar 2011 13:20:09 (#7 of 4262)

Last night Kazuki Yamada was conducting the BBC Symphony Orchestra at the Barbican. They played Takemitsu's Requiem for String Orchestra. The shortness of the piece always catches me by surprise! It is so luminous that it takes your breath away with its late post romantic sound.

The arching, wide intervaled, upward yearning string lines and many markings of expressivo gave this piece a haunting quality. It was composed in 1957 and made Takamitsu's name. Stravinsky heard and admired it.

The second piece was the UK premiere of Thomas Larcher's Violin Concerto. In a talk before the concert the composer said this piece was intended to be two journeys, both movements starting off very slowly and gently and then pushing the boundaries of creating as much wild noise as possible. He wanted not just to push the orchestra as far as it can be but also to see what can be brought out of each instrument, such as seeing how far out the bow can be stretched from the violin and still make a sound. He wrote it in the Austrian Tyrol, which is his home, and so he included cow bells as a symbol of his home.

It was thrilling. The build up of tension and noise was exciting and the final resolution I found rather disappointing but still an amazing set of sounds juxtaposed and extended to their limit. The composer himself attracted attention by wearing very tight trousers and being so agile that he leapt on to the stage at the end like an athlete!

The piece de resistance was Rachmaninov's Symphony No 2 in E minor. The orchestra was extremely tight knit and Kazuki Yamada pushed them to the limit, possibly playing it slightly faster than I have heard before. You could hear echoes of Tsaichovsky in the use of the Orthodox chants, which occur as tight circles of leitmotif, which grow and expand slowly. Because in the Orthodox Church it is considered arrogant to grow outside the structure of the chant, the music takes on a block like quality, which gives that Symphony its power. The tight structure of spans giving the leitmotif are expanded slowly by allowing romantic harmonies the extend the music into lilting arches on top of the beat provided by the original chants. Bells add to this effect, making the listener feel that we all have to remember that we have a limited time span.

Rachmaninoff was a very humble man, convinced that his music was not good. For this reason he often abridged the text, especially after he left Russia and lived in Philadelphia, when Eugene Ormandy conducted the Philadelphia Orchestra to play this piece for the firat time.

He also uses the Catholic chant of Dies Irae to add that reminder of all our ending. The passage of descending minor scales create a cacophony inspired by Tsaichovsky, who helped Rachmanininoff in his teens. Finally minimalist music takes us to the crashing finale which so takes the breath away.

Rachmaninov wrote this piece while with his family in Russia, just as the Bolsheviks were beginning to take over and he was terrified of what would happen to his family and country. I was reminded of the film Dr Zhivago throughout this piece because he caught the mood of the times perfectly.

Kazuki Yamada, along with Simeon Petchichov (excuse spelling) is one of the current gods of conducting and he was spell-binding. The way he shaped and drew the music out of the orchestra will remain one of the truly memorable experiences of my life. This is mrs aegian writing.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00yyhtf/Perf
ormance_on_3_Live_from_the_Barbican_Takemitsu_Larch
er/

aegiandyad - 05 Mar 2011 13:24:12 (#8 of 4262)

Last night Kazuki Yamada was conducting the BBC Symphony Orchestra at the Barbican. They played Takemitsu's Requiem for String Orchestra. The shortness of the piece always catches me by surprise! It is so luminous that it takes your breath away with its late post romantic sound.

The arching, wide intervaled, upward yearning string lines and many markings of espressivo gave this piece a haunting quality. It was composed in 1957 and made Takamitsu's name. Stravinsky heard and admired it.

The second piece was the UK premiere of Thomas Larcher's Violin Concerto. In a talk before the concert the composer said this piece was intended to be two journeys, both movements starting off very slowly and gently and then pushing the boundaries of creating as much wild noise as possible. He wanted not just to push the orchestra as far as it can be but also to see what can be brought out of each instrument, such as seeing how far out the bow can be stretched from the violin and still make a sound. He wrote it in the Austrian Tyrol, which is his home, and so he included cow bells as a symbol of his home.

It was thrilling. The build up of tension and noise was exciting and the final resolution I found rather disappointing but still an amazing set of sounds juxtaposed and extended to their limit. The composer himself attracted attention by wearing very tight trousers and being so agile that he leapt on to the stage at the end like an athlete!

The piece de resistance was Rachmaninov's Symphony No 2 in E minor. The orchestra was extremely tight knit and Kazuki Yamada pushed them to the limit, possibly playing it slightly faster than I have heard before. You could hear echoes of Tsaichovsky in the use of the Orthodox chants, which occur as tight circles of leitmotif, which grow and expand slowly. Because in the Orthodox Church it is considered arrogant to grow outside the structure of the chant, the music takes on a block like quality, which gives that Symphony its power. The tight structure of spans giving the leitmotif are expanded slowly by allowing romantic harmonies the extend the music into lilting arches on top of the beat provided by the original chants. Bells add to this effect, making the listener feel that we all have to remember that we have a limited time span.

Rachmaninoff was a very humble man, convinced that his music was not good. For this reason he often abridged the text, especially after he left Russia and lived in Philadelphia, when Eugene Ormandy conducted the Philadelphia Orchestra to play this piece for the firat time.

He also uses the Catholic chant of Dies Irae to add that reminder of all our ending. The passage of descending minor scales create a cacophony inspired by Tsaichovsky, who helped Rachmanininoff in his teens. Finally minimalist music takes us to the crashing finale which so takes the breath away.

Rachmaninov wrote this piece while with his family in Russia, just as the Bolsheviks were beginning to take over and he was terrified of what would happen to his family and country. I was reminded of the film Dr Zhivago throughout this piece because he caught the mood of the times perfectly.

Kazuki Yamada, along with Simeon Petchickov (excuse spelling) is one of the current gods of conducting and he was spell-binding. The way he shaped and drew the music out of the orchestra will remain one of the truly memorable experiences of my life. This is mrs aegian writing.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00yyhtf/Perf
ormance_on_3_Live_from_the_Barbican_Takemitsu_Larch
er/

aegiandyad - 05 Mar 2011 15:08:09 (#9 of 4262)

Apologies for posting twice. Could we have a chamber music thread? The Wigmore is one of our favourite places.

Columba3 - 05 Mar 2011 18:17:47 (#10 of 4262)

aegiandyad

It sounds a marvellous concert. You write very movingly about it. ___________________________________

diomu_II

I was getting too hooked on GUT and decided to opt out for a season. Then a few days ago I had several e-mails on facebook saying that the Guardian Newspaper had closed the site down. I was shattered and decided to start posting again. I must say its great to be back. Hopefully this new venture will thrive as Web Crossing is ceasing next month.

Columba3 - 05 Mar 2011 18:42:01 (#11 of 4262)

cavewoman

Mozart and Schubert have that wonderful gift of being able to communicate with the listener in a way that transcends time and place.

Mozart's quintets - especially the Clarinet Quintet and the G Minor String Quintet, express depths seldom reached by other composers. The same is true of Schubert's String Quintet D 956. I also love the Mozart Requiem Mass as well as the Great C Minor Mass. The latter of course was never completed, but it is perfection as it is.

Ricolas - 05 Mar 2011 20:02:08 (#12 of 4262)

I am listening to Matrimonio Segreto at the moment. Cimarosa. Utterly lovely. Sort of a more italianate Mozart. It lacks the moments of transcent magic that Mozart has, but then again, so does most music!

aegiandyad - 05 Mar 2011 20:05:57 (#13 of 4262)

Thank you Columba. As I grow older the only thing which really excites me and grips me by the throat as it were is classical music.

I am always emboldened and encouraged to see that the Barbican concerts are always packed by young people in their late teens and early twenties. I was sitting next to my teenage daughter on one side and a girl with blue streaks in her hair on the other side!

Ricolas - 05 Mar 2011 20:11:49 (#14 of 4262)

Just imagine what it could like if we taught music properly in our state schools, eh?

aegiandyad - 05 Mar 2011 21:01:15 (#15 of 4262)

Ricolas, I know very little about it. My own kids had excellent teaching at their secondary modern or whatever they are called. My daughter went to a Convent for A Levels and there the music teaching was astounding. The sang a piece specially commissioned by Howard Goodall, "The Pearl". It was a deeply moving experience to hear the girls singing this amazing piece.

You probably know more about how music is taught so please tell us what you know about it. It is an important subject for all of us as a society.

Ricolas - 05 Mar 2011 21:17:15 (#16 of 4262)

Well, we have been through it all before in the past, and I think there are those who could put it better than me; suffice it to say that I am quite concerned indeed that it is being neglected, ignored and belittled. Without pointing out the many many links between music and other skills - music, logical thinking, self working etc - the loss of the music itself to children is tragic. To play or to appreciate.

Perhaps the penny will drop at some point.

Columba3 - 07 Mar 2011 08:36:48 (#17 of 4262)

Its probably rarer these days, but I went to a boarding school where we had music appreciation classes. From the age of nine we were introduced to the music of the great composers...everything from Bach to Stravinsky. We had a remarkable music master who was also the assistant organist at the local Cathedral. There's little doubt that those classes had a very beneficial effect on many of us. Apart from the fact that they were a total break from the usual academic pursuits they profoundly influenced my subsequent life. The same teacher gave me piano lessons when he often demonstrated his own love of Chopin and Lizst.

aegiandyad - 07 Mar 2011 09:18:04 (#18 of 4262)

Sadly there's no time for such 'elitist' pursuits today. It's rush, rush, rush to get through the various exam hurdles set up since Thatcher's time. Also, thanks to the current idolisation of Darwin, it is science, science, science all the way.

Music, literature, art appreciation pwah...who needs those 'loser' subjects...?

I often wonder how Darwin would feel if he could come back and see the legacy he left behind. The attitude today is that if you put a group of monkeys in front of a set of typewriters and gave them infinite time they would come up with the works of Shakespeare, ergo, Shakespeare and all the arts are crap because even monkeys could come up with such 'stuff'.

Cavewoman - 07 Mar 2011 10:26:00 (#19 of 4262)

I was incredibly lucky in having the parents I had. My father was an earnest young left-wing journalist from a very working-class background and he made his own music discoveries. He had the simplified scores of Mozart's operas (vocal line + piano accompaniment) and I can remember as a toddler sitting on his knee listening to wonderful singing and music, with Dad following the score with his finger, to show me the shape of it. They had lots of friends who also loved music and a strong memory is of drifting off to sleep to the strains of Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Bix Beiderbecke, Jelly Roll Morton et al. So it was all handed to me on a plate, just part of normal life, and I never had any fears about the "difficulty" of classical music or opera. A wonderful legacy.

Columba3 - 07 Mar 2011 10:56:27 (#20 of 4262)

aegian,

"I often wonder how Darwin would feel if he could come back and see the legacy he left behind."

Interesting question.

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