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Started by Shadrack22 on Aug 16, 2019 9:52:33 AM
If humans vanished overnight, what would happen to the planet?

How quickly would evidence of human civilisation start to degrade and disappear? What would be the impact on wildlife and other life forms? How long would it take for cities to vanish as they become reforested?

Speculate here.

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browserbutton - 16 Aug 2019 10:17:31 (#1 of 176)

Wildlife is flourishing around the Chernobyl plant, even in the Red Forest area which was the most contaminated.

TRaney - 16 Aug 2019 10:19:03 (#2 of 176)

Damn, I thought this would a be a uran thread

Heckler - 16 Aug 2019 10:22:07 (#3 of 176)

Often wondered at this, I think the interesting thing (which I don't know) is how much human interaction nuclear power-stations require to function and if you removed that, would there be eventually a crisis in one of them causing a run away Chernobyl type event?

solomongursky - 16 Aug 2019 10:25:54 (#4 of 176)

Dams bursting. There would be loads of fires. Imagine a fire in a tall building on a windy day with no fire crews.

JohnIlly - 16 Aug 2019 10:31:58 (#5 of 176)

Wildlife is flourishing around the Chernobyl plant

I wonder whether the effect of radiation would be to speed up eveolution by increasing the rate of random mutations.

Catspyjamas17 - 16 Aug 2019 10:33:35 (#6 of 176)

Cats would be fine. Most cat food is not even in tins anyway now.

machiavelli - 16 Aug 2019 10:35:25 (#7 of 176)

Various nuclear plants and facilities would cause problems without orderly decommissioning.

Rendered - 16 Aug 2019 10:36:08 (#8 of 176)

There was an interesting programme on C4 a few years ago called something like 'Earth after people'.

Overgrown, I seem to remember.

RosyLovelady - 16 Aug 2019 10:36:27 (#9 of 176)

Those dodgy dandelions would be everywhere.

TRaney - 16 Aug 2019 10:47:53 (#10 of 176)

The weeds were horrendous!

TommyDGNR8 - 16 Aug 2019 11:07:29 (#11 of 176)

The monkeys take over. I saw a documentary about it.

solomongursky - 16 Aug 2019 11:09:18 (#12 of 176)

Dogs would be the apex predator, unless wild animals escaped.

TRaney - 16 Aug 2019 11:10:13 (#13 of 176)

escaped from where?

pranzingfrogg - 16 Aug 2019 11:11:25 (#14 of 176)

Not seagulls? No, come to think of it, the loss of chips would mean they’d starve.

solomongursky - 16 Aug 2019 11:16:11 (#15 of 176)

I mean wild animals in zoos. Bears, wolves, I dunno.

Agaliarept - 16 Aug 2019 11:19:22 (#16 of 176)

I wonder whether the effect of radiation would be to speed up eveolution by increasing the rate of random mutations.

There was a doc about an American who is studying animals in the Chernobyl zone. Annoyingly far from the mutations creating two headed nuclear freaks he found that animals living in the zone are just smaller.

Which I get is still a mutation but it's hardly the cool sort we were hoping for.

Gotout - 16 Aug 2019 11:45:14 (#17 of 176)

Dogs would be the apex predator

I'd put my money on rats, they're survivors.

solomongursky - 16 Aug 2019 11:48:35 (#18 of 176)

Raptors would take care of rats, in 25 years most cities and roads will be vegetation and tree cover.

Gotout - 16 Aug 2019 11:54:01 (#19 of 176)

You wouldn't even need 25 years looking at Detroit.

http://motorcitymuckraker.com/2014/06/06/up-close-8-most-abandoned-neighborhoods-in-detroit/

solomongursky - 16 Aug 2019 11:56:01 (#20 of 176)

Some stubborn old Scottish people are refusing to move out of flats marked for demolition so the council stopped tending communal areas. It's now head height in buddleia and brambles. Only been a couple of years.

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