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Started by predicated on Aug 7, 2014 8:45:01 PM
Eyes On The Skies

ISS, satellite and other heavenly body spotting. Heads up!

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predicated - 07 Aug 2014 20:45:58 (#1 of 237)

http://iss.astroviewer.net/observation.php?lon=-3.1790899999999738&lat=51.48158100000001&n
ame=Cardiff


The reference ground point on this link is Cardiff, times at other locations may vary. Just after midnight here.

MonsoonBloom - 08 Aug 2014 09:46:11 (#2 of 237)

I bet isis have their eyes of the skies right now.

FleurDuMal - 08 Aug 2014 09:49:42 (#3 of 237)

Keilder Forest is a good place to stargaze - there's very little light pollution there.

predicated - 08 Aug 2014 15:36:23 (#4 of 237)

Disappointingly cloudy at the critical time here. I think the next bright passes are tomorrow.

Pentecost - 16 Aug 2014 21:34:46 (#5 of 237)

I know Kielder well, and stargazing is only what most people there do while having a cigarette.

Yersinia - 16 Aug 2014 22:22:20 (#6 of 237)

I recommend Virtual Astronomer on twitter for ISS and meteor alerts

https://twitter.com/VirtualAstro

Cloudy here.

Yersinia - 16 Aug 2014 22:35:48 (#7 of 237)

And the associated meteorwatch blog

http://www.meteorwatch.org/uk-iss-passes-august-2014.html#more-5794

champagnerocker - 16 Aug 2014 22:55:20 (#8 of 237)

I recommend http://www.heavens-above.com/ which has very user friendly information for satellites, comets and other bits and bobs.

Iridium statellite "flares" always make me go wow.

predicated - 17 Aug 2014 16:34:46 (#9 of 237)

Excellent links, thanks.

Yersinia - 18 Aug 2014 22:15:46 (#10 of 237)

ISS due in a few mins.

Yersinia - 18 Aug 2014 22:31:07 (#11 of 237)

That was very low in the sky, but easily visible, and we just caught it before it disappeared behind an oak tree.

Only two more to go in August, then it won't return until October.

Something else passed over before it appeared, too, but going the wrong direction.

predicated - 18 Aug 2014 23:18:34 (#12 of 237)

There aren't as many sightings in wintertime but at least they come around at reasonable times of day.

Yersinia - 19 Aug 2014 21:28:40 (#13 of 237)

Any minute now...

Yersinia - 19 Aug 2014 23:40:16 (#14 of 237)

Anyone in the north with dark skies should get out there - there are reports of Aurora visible from the North Norfolk coast northwards.

predicated - 19 Aug 2014 23:45:18 (#15 of 237)

heads up to office block roof

mmuskin - 24 Aug 2014 05:23:16 (#16 of 237)

You'd need a telescope to see either of the ESA's two "wrong-way orbit" Galileo navigation satellites recently mislaunched by a Soyuz rocket.

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/2-european-sat-nav-satellites-course-orbits

flowbagging - 24 Aug 2014 08:44:19 (#17 of 237)

NASA provides email warnings, or alerts, or various things, the ISS being one. too much light round here to see it though.

Yersinia - 24 Aug 2014 10:44:07 (#18 of 237)

The ISS? It varies in brightness, but when it's on its brightest passes it's the brightest thing in the sky and can be seen even from central London, on a clear night. Won't see it till October now though.

Heavens above, linked by Champagnerocker, provides predictions for various satellites - I used it the other day when I saw something while waiting for the ISS. You can set it to your own location

http://www.heavens-above.com/AllSats.aspx?lat=51.5&lng=0&loc=
Unspecified&alt=54&tz=GMT

TommyDGNR8 - 24 Aug 2014 11:10:42 (#19 of 237)

I tipped a friend off about a Christmas Eve ISS passing a couple of years ago; he took his daughter out to see "Santa" just before putting her to bed.

champagnerocker - 24 Aug 2014 13:53:40 (#20 of 237)

The ISS will be up to a maximum of almost magnitude -4 brightness.

Only the sun, the moon and Venus will be brighter. It can be easily seen from central London with eyes that aren't dark adapted.

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