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Leftie - 09 Oct 2019 15:01:44 (#1 of 39)

For some reason, this article reminded me of being in one of my infant schools, where we had a lesson where we are allowed to try different apples. I think it was the first time I'd had a Cox's Pippin!

We also made butter another time.

airynothing - 09 Oct 2019 15:09:20 (#2 of 39)

I enjoyed that. Thanks, Leftie.

Leftie - 09 Oct 2019 15:23:53 (#3 of 39)

"Heritage Apples by Caroline Ball is published by the Bodleian Library. To buy for £22 (RRP £25) go to bookshop.theguardian.com or call 020 3176 3837. P&P charges may apply."

That's a bit steep for book.

carterbrandon - 09 Oct 2019 15:34:59 (#4 of 39)

Worcesters used to be common. Lovely with a hunk of hard cheese.

Leftie - 09 Oct 2019 15:36:39 (#5 of 39)

I really fancy some apple sauce now!

HouseOfLametta - 09 Oct 2019 15:38:37 (#6 of 39)

I bet.

browserbutton - 09 Oct 2019 15:45:10 (#7 of 39)

I like a dog's snout.

Catspyjamas17 - 09 Oct 2019 15:52:52 (#8 of 39)

We had a little orchard at the rural studies college I went to recently for my horticulture course and we were allowed to scrump apples from it occasionally. No idea what types, think they were developing their own with grafting but they were really lovely, big and juicy. Supermarket fruit is often so rubbish but I don't have a good alternative locally. Other than growing my own.

bevernbridge - 09 Oct 2019 15:56:39 (#9 of 39)

James Grieve. Doesn't keep, bruises very easily.

But tastes wonderful, and is very juicy.

JohnIlly - 09 Oct 2019 15:56:54 (#10 of 39)

Worcesters used to be common. Lovely with a hunk of hard cheese.

The problem with Worcesters is that they start to go soft within a couple of days of picking. Not good for retailing.

We had a tree in the garden when we moved here. Lovely apples but we sent IllyJnr to school with a sack full: not just an apple for teacher but one for everybody.

FleurDuMal - 09 Oct 2019 15:57:31 (#11 of 39)

I don't like apples raw. I like them cooked though.

browserbutton - 09 Oct 2019 15:58:12 (#12 of 39)

I'm very proud of my scarlet balls.

browserbutton - 09 Oct 2019 15:58:37 (#13 of 39)

Actually they are heritage turnips soz

Catspyjamas17 - 09 Oct 2019 15:59:58 (#14 of 39)

I need some kind of grabber for our apples before a flock of parakeets come and eat them as I can't reach them from the ground. I only recently discovered they made good eating raw, as for ages I thought they were Bramleys.

HouseOfLametta - 09 Oct 2019 16:02:00 (#15 of 39)

Most of the old apples around here are incredibly sour cider varieties. The other day I was out with the boys and they were pissing about, like they do, and I was standing there, just trying to be aware enough that they didn't kill each other, and I pulled this little red apple off the gnarly old tree next to me and ...gingerly... sank my teeth in.

Ye gods it was delicious! Tiny, dry, hard, but so much sweet, scented appley flavour! It blew my taste buds out.

Dubris - 09 Oct 2019 22:17:03 (#16 of 39)

#3 - Depends on the book. I& #39;ve often spent that or more, but I& #39;d hope for a hardback with a good number of illustrations. Never yet one about apples though.

Sabacious - 09 Oct 2019 22:37:52 (#17 of 39)

Not easy to find some of these apples. On trips to deepest darkest Kent I can find a few more varieties and also of single variety juice, but would love to try more apple varieties.

Sabacious - 09 Oct 2019 22:38:06 (#18 of 39)

I'm going to have a russet right now

carterbrandon - 09 Oct 2019 22:41:38 (#19 of 39)

Ooo, I can't be doing with those billiard balls.

This is making me want some still cider, though.

airynothing - 09 Oct 2019 23:02:27 (#20 of 39)

Try Brogdale, Sab.

http://www.brogdale.org/index.php

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