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Started by OldLefty on Nov 8, 2019 11:46:06 AM
What is the most ridiculous thing a teacher ever tried to get you to believe?

When I was about seven, a teacher in a Catholic school told us that a church in Italy had St Peter's skull. They knew it was his because it had two grooves running down from the eyes, and these were caused after Peter denied knowing Jesus. Apparently, he wept so much that his tears caused the grooves.

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HouseOfLametta - 08 Nov 2019 11:50:59 (#1 of 98)

Cross country running is good for you.

Moschops - 08 Nov 2019 11:51:34 (#2 of 98)

That it hurt him more than me.

thisonehasalittlehat - 08 Nov 2019 11:52:59 (#3 of 98)

My science teacher once said my work was "spastic". I thought this was inappropriate.

Dayraven - 08 Nov 2019 11:55:12 (#4 of 98)

a teacher in a Catholic school told us that a church in Italy had St Peter's skull

Did they also have the skull of St. Peter when he was a little boy?

HouseOfLametta - 08 Nov 2019 11:56:14 (#5 of 98)

That this was "shepherds pie"

OldLefty - 08 Nov 2019 11:57:56 (#6 of 98)

#4

Saints do seem to have more bones that the rest of us, judging by the number of relics. And judging by the number of Catholic churches claiming to have a bit of Jesus' cross, it must have been the tallest structure ever built.

thisonehasalittlehat - 08 Nov 2019 11:58:31 (#7 of 98)

I think we all know none of these relics are real.

Antimatter - 08 Nov 2019 11:59:02 (#8 of 98)

That the lid of a tin, was the same size as the base. I was about 9, there was nearly a riot.

OldLefty - 08 Nov 2019 11:59:15 (#9 of 98)

<<Throws bolt of lightning at Hatters>>

dottie30 - 08 Nov 2019 12:00:09 (#10 of 98)

I think we all know none of these relics are real.



People knew that in the Middle Ages. As is obvious by the way Chaucer takes the piss.

Gotout - 08 Nov 2019 12:03:33 (#11 of 98)

I think we all know none of these relics are real.

But it did make for a very lucrative industry...

OldLefty - 08 Nov 2019 12:04:36 (#12 of 98)

The churches and the people who made the fakes obviously knew that, but not the people who made long pilgrimages to see them (and were expected to make generous donations to the church holding the relic). Even today, there are people who believe the Turin Shroud was wrapped around Jesus' body, even though it has been carbon dated to 1260–1390.

thisonehasalittlehat - 08 Nov 2019 12:06:30 (#13 of 98)

People knew that in the Middle Ages. As is obvious by the way Chaucer takes the piss.

He had the pardoner claim to have a lot of relics he clearly could not have possessed; I think it's unlikely that chaucer would have doubted the provenance of established relics.

thisonehasalittlehat - 08 Nov 2019 12:09:12 (#14 of 98)

The churches and the people who made the fakes obviously knew that

Not necessarily. That's a modern scientific mindset. There's quite a lot of evidence of medieval people faking things because they believed there was a kind of moral truth to what they were doing. For example, the monks at battle abbey completely fabricated documents proving their entitlement to the land on which Abbey was built, but appeared to think that the literal falseness of these documents was a trifle compared to the moral rightness of their ownership of the land.

TRaney - 08 Nov 2019 12:09:18 (#15 of 98)

but not the people who made long pilgrimages to see them

That is also questionable

LemonGrass - 08 Nov 2019 12:13:23 (#16 of 98)

There's quite a lot of evidence of medieval people faking things because they believed there was a kind of moral truth to what they were doing.

Religious people nowadays behave like that.

thisonehasalittlehat - 08 Nov 2019 12:13:56 (#17 of 98)

Indeed.

thisonehasalittlehat - 08 Nov 2019 12:14:58 (#18 of 98)

Anyway the point is that they may not have thought of it as faking, but more as reinstating something that really by rights should be there. Obviously the idea of truth and falsehood were a bit more fuzzy than we might think of them. If someone is evil, then bearing false witness about them is really imposing a truth on a messy, muddled, and imperfect world. And thus were many people hanged.

TRaney - 08 Nov 2019 12:17:47 (#19 of 98)

This is very good on the topic

https://press.princeton.edu/books/paperback/978069
1169682/why-can-the-dead-do-such-great-things

OldLefty - 08 Nov 2019 12:18:04 (#20 of 98)

I was brought up Catholic, and there was never any question that the little round doodah we were invited to kiss every Good Friday held a bit of Jesus' cross. The priest used to go on about how lucky the parish was to have it (although as far as I can see most catholic churches claimed to have a bit of it). If anyone had questioned it, it would have been like an HM Bateman cartoon.

Believing a relic is genuine is no more outlandish than believing that wafers and red wine literally turn into human flesh and blood when certain words are said over them, and that is a fundamental Catholic belief. If you don't believe that you cannot be a Catholic.

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