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Started by TommyDGNR8 on Apr 23, 2021 9:41:43 AM
Places that aren't where you think they should be

This is probably another "just me" thing, but does anyone else associate place names with entirely different locations?

A few examples:

Durham - Down Cornwall way somewhere (this possibly stems from childhood confusion with durum wheat and the notion that arable farming was common in the deep south.

Pontefract - between Pontypridd and Pontypool, obvs.

Ramsbottom - faded south coast holiday resort

Garstang - a dodgy Glasgow housing scheme

FleurDuMal - 24 Apr 2021 14:06:57 (#181 of 463)

Balerno. It should be in Sicily instead of being just outside Edinburgh.

coshipi - 24 Apr 2021 14:09:36 (#182 of 463)

Was Aberdeen also stolen from Wales?

Ecclefechan is also obviously originally Welsh, meaning "Little Eccle."

Macpaddy - 24 Apr 2021 14:15:50 (#183 of 463)

No, cos, Aberdeen is all Scots, they just stole the idea of 'Aber' from the Welsh.

coshipi - 24 Apr 2021 14:17:15 (#184 of 463)

#183

Yup, that makes perfect sense.

How Ecclefechan got its Fechan - and for that matter how it's pronounced - has me mystified though.

wickeltisch - 24 Apr 2021 14:24:01 (#185 of 463)

they just stole the idea of 'Aber' from the Welsh

Aber Wrac’h is in Brittany (also formerly inhabited by Celts). Doesn't aber mean river?

Macpaddy - 24 Apr 2021 14:25:11 (#186 of 463)

Mouth of or estuary - aber.

wickeltisch - 24 Apr 2021 14:27:02 (#187 of 463)

Ah, thanks. I got it nearly right.

Macpaddy - 24 Apr 2021 14:29:59 (#188 of 463)

Welsh for river is Afon, pronounced Avon.

HorstVogel - 24 Apr 2021 14:31:38 (#189 of 463)

But the River Avon isn't in Wales! Well, not the well known one.

wickeltisch - 24 Apr 2021 14:33:53 (#190 of 463)

So the river Avon seems to have had that name for a very very long time. Or did the incoming Saxons just think it was the name of this one special river and used it as a proper name?

wickeltisch - 24 Apr 2021 14:36:04 (#191 of 463)

#189 All of England was inhabited by Celts who were then driven away by the Saxon hordes. So Celtic languages were spoken in all of England.

TommyDGNR8 - 24 Apr 2021 14:38:40 (#192 of 463)

A River River to go with the Hill Hill Hill Hill.

ReverendBlueJeans - 24 Apr 2021 14:41:42 (#193 of 463)

Re Balerno - there is a trend for -o endings in Fife and Lothian: Balmanno, Balmullo, Monboddo, Cambo.

OldLefty - 24 Apr 2021 14:41:55 (#194 of 463)

The Celtic languages (Scots Gaelic, Irish, Welsh, Cornish, Breton) are related and have words in common.

wickeltisch - 24 Apr 2021 14:45:04 (#195 of 463)

In northern France you'll find place names that do not sound French at all, towns like Ochtezeele or Volkerinckhove. The area belonged to the NL until the 17th century but the place names were never frenchified.

Macpaddy - 24 Apr 2021 15:06:56 (#196 of 463)

# 193. Glasgo.

wickeltisch - 24 Apr 2021 15:09:52 (#197 of 463)

Linlithgo

browserbutton - 24 Apr 2021 15:14:56 (#198 of 463)

There is a Hermannsburg in Germany, as you might expect. But there is also one in the Australian outback, 125km south west of Alice Springs. This was missionaries at work, spreading terror among the indigenous people.

wickeltisch - 24 Apr 2021 15:18:11 (#199 of 463)

Settlers often took their place names with them to new settlements, as Boston for example proves. The first English settlers there probably also spread terror among the indigenous people.

bossab2 - 24 Apr 2021 15:24:43 (#200 of 463)

I assumed Louth was in Scotland

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