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Started by Pentecost on Aug 7, 2018 10:01:48 PM
“Anyone who still believes that speeding is a trivial offence needs to think again.

“Anyone who still believes that speeding is a trivial offence needs to think again. That’s because excessive or inappropriate speed has a singularly devastating impact on the safety of road users, increasing both the risk of a crash and the severity of the consequences.”

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Pentecost - 07 Aug 2018 22:03:07 (#1 of 279)

Lost the link from where that came, but take it as it is posted. Sorry.

solomongursky - 07 Aug 2018 22:06:11 (#2 of 279)

Chief inspector Graham Milne, Cleveland and Durham Specialist Operations Unit:

http://roadsafetygb.org.uk/news/week-long-speed-operation-gets-underway/

Pentecost - 07 Aug 2018 22:08:08 (#3 of 279)

excessive or inappropriate speed

Two different things. Inappropriate to the conditions and circumstances. Excessive to the arbitrary limits applied.

carterbrandon - 07 Aug 2018 22:11:05 (#4 of 279)

arbitrary

adjective

1. based on random choice or personal whim, rather than any reason or system.

You are Jeremy Clarkson and I claim my £5.

TRaney - 07 Aug 2018 22:14:48 (#5 of 279)

Everybody knows speeding isn’t really breaking the law.

Pentecost - 07 Aug 2018 22:15:02 (#6 of 279)

Not at all. 20, not 22. 30, not 29. 40, not 41. 70 not 74. Arbitrary figures rounded to end in a zero, not objective values derived from any scientific or objective study.

TRaney - 07 Aug 2018 22:15:17 (#7 of 279)

It can’t be because laws are for people I dislike.

solomongursky - 07 Aug 2018 22:15:59 (#8 of 279)

20, not 22.

What's the difference between 20 and 22 mph in terms of survivability?

Pentecost - 07 Aug 2018 22:17:21 (#9 of 279)

There hasn't been a scientific study to determine that. So the point about these things beings arbitrarily rounded to end in zero stands.

solomongursky - 07 Aug 2018 22:18:01 (#10 of 279)

There hasn't been a scientific study to determine that

You sure about that?

carterbrandon - 07 Aug 2018 22:18:38 (#11 of 279)

#8: And when you've calculated that, factor in the fact that increments of 5 mph are easier to stick to given speedo design and therefore more effective.

#9: Weaselly. You didn't say rounding was arbitrary, you said that speed limits were arbitrary. Jeremy.

Pentecost - 07 Aug 2018 22:20:28 (#12 of 279)

You sure about that?

Yes. If there has been a scientific and peer-reviewed study definitively comparing the survivability rates of impacts in 20 mph zones with those in 22 mph zones, then link to it now.

Impedimenta - 07 Aug 2018 22:21:27 (#13 of 279)

20 is easier to remember than 23 though. That's surely not random?

Pentecost - 07 Aug 2018 22:22:02 (#14 of 279)

No one ever said it was random, just that it was arbitrary. In the mathematical sense, I should have said.

Dubris - 07 Aug 2018 22:22:35 (#15 of 279)

And because speed limits have to be relatively simple and easy to understand and follow, we have a set of standard figures.

Imagine how confusing it would be if the speed limit changed with every bend, hill, straight stretch and so on: 30, then 35, then 26, then 41, perhaps.

carterbrandon - 07 Aug 2018 22:24:50 (#16 of 279)

#15: Oh, but we're in the presence of a skilled driver who could easily cope with that, and it would be outright tyranny to penalise him with slowing down just because other people couldn't keep up or got killed.

Snarlygog - 07 Aug 2018 22:25:44 (#17 of 279)

https://ec.europa.eu/transport/road_safety/special
ist/knowledge/speed/speed_is_a_central_issue_in_roa
d_safety/speed_and_the_injury_risk_for_different_sp
eed_levels_en


Try this for size?

widenation - 07 Aug 2018 22:27:27 (#18 of 279)

#roadcraft

solomongursky - 07 Aug 2018 22:30:51 (#19 of 279)

There hasn't been a scientific study to determine that.

Newton covered it:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinetic_energy

levelgaze - 07 Aug 2018 22:32:05 (#20 of 279)

Who was it on here who used to always argue that it was "frustration, not speed that kills?" I think their mad theory was that the desire to overtake someone going slightly slower than you was an irresistible force, or something.

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