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Started by TheVoiceOfReason on Aug 10, 2018 7:51:51 AM
Anger as airport staff BANNED from calling passengers “DARLING”

Staff working at Gatwick Airport have been banned from calling passengers “love” or “darling”, after receiving ONE complaint. Passengers travelling in the busy London Airport are to be referred to either by their name or “Sir or Madam”, according to a memo issued to staff.

A trades union representative said, “If we can’t casually sexually harass women by calling them ‘darling’ in a friendly-yet-slightly-threatening way, we’ll be forced to do more strip searches.”

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/transport/gatwick-staff-banned-from-calling-customers-love-or-darling-a3907871.html

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AlanII - 10 Aug 2018 07:54:25 (#1 of 56)

Hahaha. Masterful "quotation" there, bravo.

Tadagee - 10 Aug 2018 07:58:29 (#2 of 56)

I pity any Geordies working there who are obliged by law under the Lovable Cheeky Lads from theToon Act 1864 to refer to all women as 'Pet'.

HorstVogel - 10 Aug 2018 08:39:56 (#3 of 56)

I wouldn't mind "luv", but darling is a bit off putting

darkhorse - 10 Aug 2018 08:42:54 (#4 of 56)

This story again, a tabloid fave for decades! Eg.

https://www.thesun.co.uk/archives/news/343522/bus-drivers-banned-from-calling-women-love/

RosyLovelady - 10 Aug 2018 08:44:26 (#5 of 56)

"Darlin'" used to be a common enough form of address to female customers from cabbies, decorators, electricians, driving instructors etc. The male equivalent was usually "guv" or "squire".

Dubris - 10 Aug 2018 08:45:02 (#6 of 56)

"Sir" or "Madam" is rather binary. What if a passenger doesn't identify as either of those? At least "darling" can apply to all the world.

darkhorse - 10 Aug 2018 08:46:52 (#7 of 56)

What if your name is Darling?

“Here’s your boarding pass, Mr Madam”.

machiavelli - 10 Aug 2018 08:54:33 (#8 of 56)

I wouldn't mind "luv", but darling is a bit off putting

"Luv" is the nice Northern form of address. "Darlin" is leery presumption by Cokernee types.

bossab2 - 10 Aug 2018 08:55:42 (#9 of 56)

As they have your details they could just call you Bob or Sarah.

invicta - 10 Aug 2018 09:04:20 (#10 of 56)

That's even worse. Like those irritating fuchsias on Starbucks asking for your name and then getting it wrong.

GyratingTrampoline - 10 Aug 2018 09:07:52 (#11 of 56)

It would be particularly bad for me because my real name is neither Bob nor Sarah

HorstVogel - 10 Aug 2018 09:07:57 (#12 of 56)

That's even worse.



agree

Gotout - 10 Aug 2018 09:33:43 (#13 of 56)

Perhaps we could call each other comrade?

HorstVogel - 10 Aug 2018 09:36:29 (#14 of 56)

nah, a simple universal genderless "luv", or "duck"

fogger - 10 Aug 2018 09:39:21 (#15 of 56)

What about 'big tits'?

Stellata - 10 Aug 2018 09:40:02 (#16 of 56)

Oh dear. Some people would last long in the North. Everybody calls everybody love, darling, pet etc. up there.

I think it really does depend on who is saying it, and how.

browserbutton - 10 Aug 2018 09:42:44 (#17 of 56)

I agree, it doesn't come across as very courteous or professional if it's your doctor or bank manager -- but airports are rough and ready places.

Gotout - 10 Aug 2018 09:43:36 (#18 of 56)

Last time I was down in the Midlands a lady in a shop called me 'Chuck'. Ought I to have been offended?

ZimAgain - 10 Aug 2018 09:44:16 (#19 of 56)

She probably mistook you for Prince Charles.

machiavelli - 10 Aug 2018 09:44:39 (#20 of 56)

Last time I was down in the Midlands a lady in a shop called me 'Chuck'. Ought I to have been offended?

Only if you are not a tool used to extract a drill bit from a drill.

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