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Started by Policywatcher on Oct 6, 2018 4:47:50 PM
Where letting authorities go to the lowest tender without oversight gets us.
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Policywatcher - 06 Oct 2018 16:49:07 (#1 of 80)

A criminal investigation has been launched into how a major NHS supplier employed by dozens of hospital trusts retained body parts including amputated limbs and waste from cancer treatment.



...The HSJ website said: “This anatomical waste, which is made up of human body parts and surgical waste, has now been placed in fridges. HES is also attempting to export 750 tonnes of pharmaceutical waste to Holland.”

Policywatcher - 06 Oct 2018 16:53:58 (#2 of 80)

https://www.mrw.co.uk/latest/government-alert-as-clinical-waste-firm-hes-stockpiles-body-parts/10035845.article

Too big to fail?

If HES goes out of business as a result of the enforcement action it would “significantly impact the management of waste within both hospital and primary care services across England”, the NHS England document states.



Oh dear, oh dear... Somebody had some explaining to do.

... HES was at the centre of a legal battle between NHS England and waste company SRCL earlier this year. SRCL accused NHS England of accepting an abnormally low bid from HES. NHS England won the dispute.



And while they're not done the job, they've enjoyed the profit:

Its most recent annual accounts saw it record a gross profit of £15.4m, with sales growing 18% year on year.

bossab2 - 06 Oct 2018 16:54:25 (#3 of 80)

Yet more metropolitan jargon.

An oversight was a cock up when I was a lad.

Policywatcher - 06 Oct 2018 16:56:51 (#4 of 80)

It's always had this meaning too.

An overseer has always been someone watching over to make sure something is done right, not a Frank Spencer.

bossab2 - 06 Oct 2018 17:00:09 (#5 of 80)

True that PW...

bailliegillies - 06 Oct 2018 17:01:29 (#6 of 80)

An oversight was a cock up when I was a lad.



When I was a lad it was something people managed to overlook even though it was the elephant in the room.

Policywatcher - 06 Oct 2018 17:03:02 (#7 of 80)

Oversight as something you perform is checking it's ok.

An oversight as a noun isn't.

FleurDuMal - 06 Oct 2018 17:07:34 (#8 of 80)

I think ‘massive cock up’ is an appropriate phrase.

bailliegillies - 06 Oct 2018 17:08:22 (#9 of 80)

Oversight as something you perform is checking it's ok.



Aye but it's amazing how many elephants in the room are not seen.

FleurDuMal - 06 Oct 2018 17:09:45 (#10 of 80)

The bizarre and disturbing thing about this is, that this firm - being private - were essentially unregulated, whereas people in the NHS can’t do anything without having paperwork to prove they’ve done it.

FleurDuMal - 06 Oct 2018 17:10:26 (#11 of 80)

I understand exactly what PW means. He’s quite correct.

Policywatcher - 06 Oct 2018 17:13:14 (#12 of 80)

> FleurDuMal - 06 Oct 2018 17:09:45 ( #10 of 11)

> The bizarre and disturbing thing about this is, that this firm - being private - were essentially unregulated, whereas people in the NHS can’t do anything without having paperwork to prove they’ve done it.



Indeed.

I suspect that a lot of the "private sector is cheaper" comes from the private companies having little interest in doing it properly, and even less incentive.

Their only real incentive is to cut the cost and increase their margin.

Gotout - 06 Oct 2018 17:19:49 (#13 of 80)

The irony is that when it was done'in house' it probably cost very little more than these cheapo merchants.

Policywatcher - 06 Oct 2018 17:23:57 (#14 of 80)

Long term, probably less.

The Public sector bad, private sector good mantra has never really been anything but a way of smashing unions and making profits for the Tory party's chums.

Brunothecat - 06 Oct 2018 17:25:37 (#15 of 80)

Its most recent annual accounts saw it record a gross profit of £15.4m,

On an annual turnover of approx 32 million.

Yes, 32. 50% just straight into their pockets every year. Taxpayers money. They belong behind bars, and for a very long time.

TrouserFreak - 06 Oct 2018 17:26:51 (#16 of 80)

The lack of ability in the UK for there to be a mature and mutually beneficial relationship between union and employer is a massive weakness. If that is what contributes to the reliance on PFI.

And whilst this is a grim failing, do mistakes like this not happen anyway in the public sector?

Policywatcher - 06 Oct 2018 17:46:30 (#17 of 80)

I do not recall having seen hundreds of tons of body parts at the hospitals when it was public sector.

And I notice that you fail to address the issue of 50% of the money being ripped off without the work being done.

There's a difference between failings and fraud

FleurDuMal - 06 Oct 2018 17:50:57 (#18 of 80)

Quite. The public sector makes mistakes - like any other organisation.

This situation goes way beyond a ‘mistake’ though.

Brunothecat - 06 Oct 2018 18:03:51 (#19 of 80)

Its called "racketeering" in the US, I think.

rearranged - 06 Oct 2018 18:04:18 (#20 of 80)

I do not recall having seen hundreds of tons of body parts at the hospitals when it was public sector.

No, but thousands of samples, including whole organs, were kept illegally by parts of the NHS, in one case from before the Alder Hey scandal until almost 20 years later.

But this appears to have been a deliberate fraud, in which case there should be a prosecution.

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