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Started by YorenInTheNorth on Aug 9, 2019 5:51:14 PM
Power Cuts affect part of UK.

Major power cut hits trains in London and south-east England

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/aug/09/p
ower-cut-hits-london-and-south-east-england?


Cheshire and parts of the North West affected too.

meepmeep - 10 Aug 2019 20:51:30 (#181 of 329)

If they're falling to bits, then the manufacturer is in trouble.



I've been hearing worrying details about hot spots in offshore transmission cables that combine power and fibre...

indlovubill - 10 Aug 2019 20:53:04 (#182 of 329)

Ah come on, you're not saying the cable suppliers lied?

meepmeep - 10 Aug 2019 20:55:20 (#183 of 329)

Bill, your own link shows he's correct.

Anyway, pumped hydro doesn't respond fast enough for frequency containment, it's used for short-term operating reserve and system restoration, so wouldn't have had any part to play in the initial response - it would take over as secondary response to displace and reset the containment reserve ready for another outage.

In this case the second outage occurred before that had time to happen.

indlovubill - 10 Aug 2019 21:01:12 (#184 of 329)

Bill, your own link shows he's correct.



Ooh you're right, in my defence I must say I've been at a birthday bash this afternoon.

SinnerBoy - 10 Aug 2019 21:01:29 (#185 of 329)

They don't have that reputation, as they have to the repairs, which is pretty expensive. They need an ROV equipped construction vessel. The cable has to be dragged and recovered, cut and re-terminated, or spliced.

That costs money and they'd also have to pay damage, for lost transmission. I've never heard of it.

... That's not to say it hasn't happened.

The manufacturers are very proud of their cables. We often get a rep onboard, for the kickoff meeting and they explain something about the manufacture and durability etc.

I haven't heard of any problems with piggyback lines. They don't seem to be common, even for short, infield applications. Usually, you'll have separate power, methanol / glycol umbilicals and fibre optics.

It's common to have them running in common trenches, or the smaller line attached to the larger (not in the same sheathing - or inside s pipeline!) and then spurring off along separate routes, close to the installation.

Pinkgum - 10 Aug 2019 21:52:40 (#186 of 329)

I've been doing a lot of wondering recently about infrastructure and it's ability to cope with more extreme weather (on top of years of low maintenance/investment).

Things that used to be once a decade/lifetime/hundred years - we might need to review these timescales.

meepmeep - 10 Aug 2019 21:56:52 (#187 of 329)

https://www.theccc.org.uk/our-impact/resilience-to-climate-change/

Pinkgum - 10 Aug 2019 22:22:57 (#188 of 329)

Cheers Meep. It's good to see that they are at least looking at the bigger picture.

We had real problems at work in the "heatwave". Refrigeration systems not designed for working at those temps for significant periods. Our suppliers too (and competitors from what I can work out).

It's not national grid level stuff, but cost the company significantly and in times of shop closures and impending economic doom, these things can be make or break.

RosyLovelady - 11 Aug 2019 07:37:01 (#189 of 329)

< London Underground used to have its own power station >

and one summer day, in 1968 I think, the whole system crashed and all trains stopped running.

HouseOfLametta - 11 Aug 2019 07:46:55 (#190 of 329)

Lots of electric railways had their own generation. Many of them predated the domestic supply anyway.

Catspyjamas17 - 11 Aug 2019 07:51:21 (#191 of 329)

More electric trains than before.

More electric cars than before. But not that many at the moment. And new homes are all electric. Aren't we making ourselves more vulnerable to disruption, on a larger scale?

HouseOfLametta - 11 Aug 2019 07:58:01 (#192 of 329)

I don't give much for the long term petrochemical infrastructure.

Catspyjamas17 - 11 Aug 2019 08:00:04 (#193 of 329)

No, me neither, but it still seems like putting all our eggs in a different basket.

nemo75 - 11 Aug 2019 08:26:10 (#194 of 329)

Eee. I knew where I was with gold. I can’t get on with this new fangled paper money.

Ricolas - 11 Aug 2019 08:26:51 (#195 of 329)

London underground still has its own power station, I thought. Lots Road is gone oviously. But Greenwich is still there. Although it may be backup only?

Ricolas - 11 Aug 2019 08:28:03 (#196 of 329)

Fascinating thread btw with some brilliant insight from experts.

nemo75 - 11 Aug 2019 08:30:27 (#197 of 329)

Greenwich was for trams.

Ricolas - 11 Aug 2019 08:31:07 (#198 of 329)

...Yes. and now is not because?

nemo75 - 11 Aug 2019 08:32:10 (#199 of 329)

Because it’s not been in use for decades?

Ricolas - 11 Aug 2019 08:36:16 (#200 of 329)

it is still an active station. Whilst not generating all the time, I understood it to be - as I stated - a back up

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